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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: March ::
Re: Libraries & Chairs
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0591  Tuesday, 13 March 2001

[1]     From:   Daniel Traister <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 15:59:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0587 Libraries & Chairs

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 23:49:52 -0500
        Subj:   Libraries


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 15:59:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 12.0587 Libraries & Chairs
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0587 Libraries & Chairs

Responding to the first of Andrew Murphy's queries --

1. In the Preface to his 1857-66 edition of Shakespeare, Richard Grant
White acknowledges the access he has been given to the private
collections of Thomas Barton & James Lenox. He also says that the copy
of F1 that he 'constantly used', was that held in the Astor Library --
formerly owned by the Duke of Buckingham. Could anybody point me in the
direction of some information on the Astor Library?

The Astor Library is now part of The Astor, Lenox, and Tilden
Foundation, a.k.a. The New York Public Library. Mr. Lenox's and the
Astor Library books are still to be found at that Library. A relatively
recent history by Phyllis Dain (volume 1 only to date) provides
references to the earlier histories of the institutions that combined to
create NYPL.

Daniel Traister
Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library
University of Pennsylvania

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 23:49:52 -0500
Subject:        Libraries

To answer Andrew Murphy's question:  The Astor Library was one of the
founding institutions of the New York Public Library.

Stephanie Hughes wrote:

>Since the influx of drugs in the 1960s there has been a fairly substantial
>examination of the sources and uses of mind-altering natural substances,
>all of which can be found in
>libraries.

Which libraries, and how do I get a card?
 

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