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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: March ::
Re: Rhetoric Question
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0656  Tuesday, 20 March 2001

[1]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Friday, 16 Mar 2001 10:15:57 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0632 Re: Rhetoric Questio

[2]     From:   Ian Munro <
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        Date:   Friday, 16 Mar 2001 08:54:30 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0617 Re: Rhetoric Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Friday, 16 Mar 2001 10:15:57 -0500
Subject: 12.0632 Re: Rhetoric Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0632 Re: Rhetoric Question

About the Eagles couplet ("You can spend all your time making money/You
can spend all your love making time"): Apart from the play in the first
line on spend time/spend money, the second line implies that "making
time" (casual infidelity) can result in destruction of love--not a
million miles away from "The expense of spirit in the waste of shame,"
actually.

Dana Shilling

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ian Munro <
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Date:           Friday, 16 Mar 2001 08:54:30 -0700
Subject: 12.0617 Re: Rhetoric Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0617 Re: Rhetoric Question

Don Bloom wrote:

>My remaining question: Is there some cant or slang meaning to "making
>time"? Back in the 50's and 60's, "making" was a cant term for "having
>sex with" with an implication of seduction. Is this another rhetorical
>device, wherein "time" is swapped for "girls" or some such?

I don't have a copy anymore, but I'm pretty sure that _The Catcher in
the Rye_ uses the expression "giving her the time," which would seem to
support your suggestion.

Ian Munro
 

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