2001

Re: Weed Noted

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0593  Tuesday, 13 March 2001

[1]     From:   Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:14:03 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0580 Re: Weed Noted

[2]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 21:15:58
        Subj:   Re: Weed Noted


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:14:03 -0500
Subject: 12.0580 Re: Weed Noted
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0580 Re: Weed Noted

>ANOTHER MAJOR SCHOLARLY BREAKTHROUGH FROM SOUTH AFRICA!
>
>I was discussing the matter of Shakespeare's possible smoking habits
>with my 11-year old son when his eyes lit up.  That explains Hamlet, he
>said.  What explains Hamlet? I asked.  When he said he'd seen a ghost he
>was actually hallucinating from having smoked too much nutmeg (or
>cannabis, or cocaine, or whatever)!
>
>Now why hasn't anyone thought of that before?

Well, someone has been thinking along these lines. Two years ago, the
Actors Theater in Louisville, Kentucky presented Hamlet as a heroin
addict.

Jack Heller

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 21:15:58
Subject:        Re: Weed Noted

Please excuse my ignorance, but I have a number of questions.
(Personally, I still don't see any clear links between Shakespeare and
the pipes or cannabis...)

David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> writes:

>When he [Hamlet] said he'd seen a ghost he
>was actually hallucinating from having smoked too much nutmeg (or
>cannabis, or cocaine, or whatever)!
>
>Now why hasn't anyone thought of that before?

Does Hamlet smoke whether on or off stage? Do we have any textual
evidence to suggest that smoking is causing hallucination? Do some other
characters in the play also see the Ghost because/when/after they are
smoking? I don't see any connection between "an unweeded garden / That
grows to seed" (Norton 1.2.135-36) and cannabis... (Do I have to be a
postmodern reader to understand the connection?)

Did Elizabethans and/or Jacobeans use the term 'weed' to refer to
cannabis?  They did use the 'weed' to refer to certain herbs. But did
they consider cannabis a herb? Do we have any example from writing in
the 16th or the 17th century which clearly shows that the 'weed' was
used to refer to cannabis?

Peter, I don't think they'll leave Shakespeare alone... Maybe we should
ask Uri Geller if he can contact (the spirit of) Shakespeare for us. He
said, "Remember: I know lots of famous people." He may know Shakespeare
as well as Michael Jackson...

Takashi Kozuka
PhD Student
Centre for the Study of the Renaissance
University of Warwick (UK)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PS: I should have added a brief note. According to the OED it was not
until the 20th century that the word "weed" started to be used to refer
to cannabis.

Re: Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0592  Tuesday, 13 March 2001

[1]     From:   Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:00:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   SHK 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:06:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"

[3]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:27:23 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:00:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"
Comment:        SHK 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"

Dear Hardy, you wrote:

> Saturday's Washington Post had an interesting article about the Miramax
> film "O" - a retelling of Othello in a high school. The film has been
> completed for two years, but release keeps being held up because of high
> school shootings.
>
> "Studio Keeps a Lid on 'O' After School Shootings"
> By Sharon Waxman
> Washington Post Staff Writer
> Saturday, March 10, 2001; Page C01
>
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A49523-2001Mar9.html

You might also want to see an article on this topic from last November
in *The New York Observer* (November 13, 2000), by someone with my last
name

 http://newyorkobserver.com/pages/story.asp?ID=3417

who was quite happily "scooping" *The Washington Post* by just about
four months . . .

Cheers,
Dan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:06:12 -0500
Subject: 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"

For an earlier version of this story in the New York Observer, go to

http://www.nyobserver.com/pages/story.asp?ID=3417

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 16:27:23 -0500
Subject: 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0588 Miramax's Problems Releasing "O"

O is still listed for a 4/ 27/ 01 release at the  Dimension Films
website

http://www.upcomingmovies.com/o.html

Re: Branagh LLL on UK Pay Per View

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0590  Tuesday, 13 March 2001

From:           Philip Tomposki <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 15:38:18 EST
Subject:        Re: Branagh LLL on UK Pay Per View

For U.S. List members with DirectTV, LLL is scheduled to be available
starting Monday, March 19th.

Philip Tomposki

Re: Libraries & Chairs

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0591  Tuesday, 13 March 2001

[1]     From:   Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 15:59:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0587 Libraries & Chairs

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 12 Mar 2001 23:49:52 -0500
        Subj:   Libraries


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 15:59:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 12.0587 Libraries & Chairs
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0587 Libraries & Chairs

Responding to the first of Andrew Murphy's queries --

1. In the Preface to his 1857-66 edition of Shakespeare, Richard Grant
White acknowledges the access he has been given to the private
collections of Thomas Barton & James Lenox. He also says that the copy
of F1 that he 'constantly used', was that held in the Astor Library --
formerly owned by the Duke of Buckingham. Could anybody point me in the
direction of some information on the Astor Library?

The Astor Library is now part of The Astor, Lenox, and Tilden
Foundation, a.k.a. The New York Public Library. Mr. Lenox's and the
Astor Library books are still to be found at that Library. A relatively
recent history by Phyllis Dain (volume 1 only to date) provides
references to the earlier histories of the institutions that combined to
create NYPL.

Daniel Traister
Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library
University of Pennsylvania

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 23:49:52 -0500
Subject:        Libraries

To answer Andrew Murphy's question:  The Astor Library was one of the
founding institutions of the New York Public Library.

Stephanie Hughes wrote:

>Since the influx of drugs in the 1960s there has been a fairly substantial
>examination of the sources and uses of mind-altering natural substances,
>all of which can be found in
>libraries.

Which libraries, and how do I get a card?

Spelling Shakespeare's Name

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0589  Tuesday, 13 March 2001

From:           Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 12 Mar 2001 20:11:38 -0000
Subject:        Spelling Shakespeare's Name

I was amused to find in my mailbox this morning an E-Mail roundly
condemning me for "spelling Shakespeare's name wrong nearly ten times"
in my Web edition of William Hazlitt's essay on Hamlet from his
"Characters of Shakespear's Plays".  How could I expect to have my page
respected, I was asked, if I couldn't spell Shakespeare's name?

Of course, I explained that Hazlitt himself used the spelling
"Shakespear" because he lived before the modern fixed spelling of
Shakespeare's name was adopted as the correct one, and pointed my
correspondent towards Dave Kathman's admirable page on the spelling and
pronunciation of Shakespeare's name in the Renaissance
(http://www.clark.net/tross/ws/name1.html) as evidence of the variable
spelling of Shakespeare's name in his own time.

This did all leave me wondering, however, when and how exactly the
"Shakespeare" spelling came to be considered the only "correct" one.
The other source on my website (Helena Faucit / Lady Martin on Ophelia)
was written in the late 19th Century, as opposed to Hazlitt's early 19th
Century work, and uses what we would now regard as the correct
spelling.  Was there a formal debate about the "correct" spelling of
Shakespeare's name during the 19th Century, or was there simply a
sea-change as fashions shifted and then became fixed?  If anybody can
point me in the direction of post-Renaissance sources dealing with the
spelling of Shakespeare's name then I would be very interested to see
them.

Thomas Larque.

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