2001

Shakespeare and His Contemporaries in Performance

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0733  Friday, 30 March 2001

From:           Helen Terre Blanche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 25 Mar 2001 13:27:30 +0000
Subject:        Shakespeare Conference

Conference Announcement

Scaena: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries in Performance
9 to 11 August 2001, St John's College, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Call for papers

Papers on any aspect of the conference topic are welcome, including
'global' Shakespeares. Keynote speakers include: Simon Russell Beale,
Judith Buchanan, Anthony B. Dawson, Janette Dillon, Barbara Hodgdon,
Peter Holland, Randall Martin and Pamela Mason.

Day One: 'Shakespeare and his contemporaries on film, tv, audio and
other media.' Contact: Pascale Aebischer, Darwin College, Cambridge CB3
9EU, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Day Two: 'Shakespeare and his contemporaries in performance, including
the European drama.' Contact: Nigel Wheale, English Studies, Anglia
Polytechnic University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, e-mail:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Day Three: 'Shakespeare in performance'. Contact: Edward J. Esche,
English Studies, Anglia Polytechnic University, Cambridge CB1 1PT,
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Deadline for receipt of proposals: 30 April 2001

Deadline for receipt of completed paper: 15 June 2001

E-mail enquiries: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Website: http://www.anglia.ac.uk/scaena

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Re: Mark Twain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0732  Friday, 30 March 2001

From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 24 Mar 2001 20:27:55
Subject:        Re: Mark Twain

Charles Edelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> has answered my question:

>... I can answer Takashi Kozuka's
>query on the longer passage, 'the precious bust ..'.  That DOES come
>from the essay, 'Is Shakespeare Dead?'.

Thank you! I thought Shakespeare was still alive just like Elvis, though
:-)

Takashi Kozuka

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0730  Friday, 30 March 2001

From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Mar 2001 16:20:49 +0100
Subject:        Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

The symbolic role of the chess scene between Ferdinand and Miranda in
Act 5.

[a] Miranda clearly knows the game well enough to question Ferdinand's
strategy and even probity.

[b] BUT would women have been taught to play chess as an integral
element in European Renaissance courtly manners and skills, or was it
more likely in England than elsewhere?

[c] Or was it specifically an aristocratic, and probably specifically
masculine, pastime, hence a very obvious demonstration, and stunning
theatrical trope for Shakespeare to deploy, not only to Ferdinand but to
Alonso, and even more to a courtly audience, of Propsero's education of
his daughter well beyond 'what ordinary princesses can'?

[d] Is it a metaphor for sexual warfare - here an index of the 'new',
purified, post-Masque Ferdinand, who would not now dream of cheating in
the 'game of love or life'?

Stuart Manger

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: Callous Cash Payment Values

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0731  Friday, 30 March 2001

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 25 Mar 2001 00:27:44 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0698 Re: Callous Cash Payment Values

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Mar 2001 18:59:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0698 Re: Callous Cash Payment Values


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 25 Mar 2001 00:27:44 -0500
Subject: 12.0698 Re: Callous Cash Payment Values
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0698 Re: Callous Cash Payment Values

Much as I enjoy the pinko-bashing -- and I confess to have counted to
ten, and beyond, once or twice before deciding not to pile on  -- I
don't see anything in the latest posts in this thread 


Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0729  Friday, 30 March 2001

[1]     From:   Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday 25 Mar 2001 00:45:07 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 12.0704 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)

[2]     From:   Judith M. Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday 25 Mar 2001 15:22:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0655 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)

[3]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Mar 2001 19:32:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0704 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday 25 Mar 2001 00:45:07 +0000
Subject: Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)
Comment:        SHK 12.0704 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)

I'm sorry, but I really cannot see that anyone can or indeed need or
indeed should try to fix 'the island'. Who cares? It isn't any island,
and it is all islands. An island of the mind? I mean...... please!

Stuart Manger

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith M. Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday 25 Mar 2001 15:22:54 -0500
Subject: 12.0655 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0655 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)

David Lindley writes:

<Greenblatt famously characterised source hunting <as 'the
<elephant's graveyard' of literary criticism - and <what is most
<interesting, and most important, are the kinds of <investment one
brings
<to tracking down sources, and the different kinds <of consequence one
<draws from their recognition.

As one of the elephants--(I'm not talking "Hannibal Lector" here,
although some members of this list may identify me that way), I'm in
basic agreement with Kermode's position that the inaccuracy of
Shakespeare's geography, like his time sequences, may be due not to his
lack of knowledge, but with his penchant for compressing ideas into a
vivid image on the model of a metaphor.  I have always thought that
conflicts in "The Tempest" were a outward dramatization of the inward
conflicts in the human psyche based on Plato's model of the soul, a
popular Renaissance sourcebook, rather than an attempt to locate the
action of the play in a realistic setting.  Too much of the play is
obvious fiction for the setting to be totally accurate.

I know this idea is an old one, but I have a hard time being convinced
by newer readings that lack grounding in the thought of the time.

Best,

Judy Craig, newly arrived on cyberspace after a major computer crash
last week

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Mar 2001 19:32:52 -0500
Subject: 12.0704 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0704 Re: Kermode (Tempest Reference)

> I do believe that Shakespeare made political points, but I
> doubt very much that he made political points which were not in vogue
> until the late twentieth century.
>Larry Weiss

Prior misunderstandings aside, I suspect he did.

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
http://phoenix.liu.edu/~cstetner/cds.html
_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

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