2001

War of the Theatres

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0513  Monday, 5 March 2001

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Mar 2001 15:25:26 -0800
Subject:        War of the Theatres

Has Josiah Penniman's *The War of the Theatres* been superceded?

All the best,
Mike Jensen

Re: Castration

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0512  Monday, 5 March 2001

From:           Scott Oldenburg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Mar 2001 15:23:12 -0800
Subject: 12.0492 Re: Castration
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0492 Re: Castration

A very sincere thank you to those who, on and off list, have given me
leads for my research on castration.

Best,
Scott

Re: Hal

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0510  Monday, 5 March 2001

[1]     From:   M. Neidorff <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 02 Mar 2001 13:45:41 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Hal

[2]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 02 Mar 2001 23:04:30 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0490 Re: Hal


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           M. Neidorff <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Mar 2001 13:45:41 -0500
Subject:        Re: Hal

Ed Taft writes: But he does begin his speech: "I know you all, and will
a while uphold /The unyok'd humor of your idleness" (Riverside
1.2.195-6). He may be addressing the departing or departed Poins and
Falstaff, or the audience at large. In any case, I feel that "you all"
makes a better referent for "ugly mists" than Hal's "loose behavior"
(208).

Ed, I can certainly see it played that way. However, every time I read
this speech, I hear it starting in a tone of sadness and as much
self-contempt as contempt for Poins, et.al., not for who they are but
for the "unyoked humor of [their] idleness", of which, by upholding, Hal
is also guilty. I don't think he's addressing it to anyone but himself,
or rather, perhaps rehearsing in his mind yet again his explanation of
his actions to his father. The whole of the speech is so full of Hal's
guilty consciousness of his own idleness and rationalizations for it("If
all the year were playing holidays/ to sport would be as tedious as to
work,/but when they seldom come, they wished for come"; "so when this
loose behaviour I throw off...by how much better than my word I am";
"I'll so offend to make offense a skill")that I see the "foul and ugly
mists" as another metaphor for his own fault that he will break through
when it pleases him to be himself again (take up again his royal
duties).

Having reread the above, I also want to add that I do think we are meant
to see Hal's association with Poins, Falstaff, the drawers, etc. as one
of the positive things that ultimately makes him a good king. (And I do
see it that way) I don't agree with the interpretation that this is
simply a coldly calculated self-interested association. I read Hal as
having a real emotional bond with many of this group (certainly with
Falstaff).  Nonetheless, Hal knows what burdens and decisions await him
as king, and knows that he will not find his role-models in Eastcheap.
(He may be led by Falstaff & Poins into the robbery and the
double-cross, but quickly takes charge of them when it comes to the
war.)He knows he will ultimately have to reject this life. It is his
emotional connection to the people in this life (i.e. Falstaff) that
gives this soliloquy its emotional complexity and intellectual
hoop-jumping. At least, that's the most satisfying way for me to read
it.

Merri

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Mar 2001 23:04:30 -0500
Subject: 12.0490 Re: Hal
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0490 Re: Hal

Bill Godshalk's notion that Poins and Falstaff are "base" seems to me
well off base.  All the indications are that both are gentlemen,
relatively impecunious, perhaps (at least Falstaff is always short of
funds), but by birth and training members of the upper class of English
society-quite distinct in that way from Francis the drawer, and indeed
from Bardolph, Peto, and Gadshill (putatively Falstaff's servants).  The
familiarity that appears in the Poins-Prince relationship through both 1
and 2H4 supports the suggestion that Poins has for some time been a
member of the Prince's household, and maybe the man who first introduced
the Prince to Falstaff.  If I were directing the plays I would cast
Poins as a couple of years older than the Prince.

Familiarly,
Dave Evett

Is Cleopatra Black?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0511  Monday, 5 March 2001

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Mar 2001 15:55:04 -0500
Subject:        Is Cleopatra Black?

Is it now widely accepted among Shakespeareans that Shakespeare's
Cleopatra is black ("with Phoebus's amorous pinches black")?  M. Neill
and A. Little, Jr. assume that she is without question.  Janet Adelman
explored the question brilliantly but more tentatively in Appendix C of
The Common Liar.  If so, is this a development in academic criticism
only?  How recent is it?  Has stage practice followed suit?  Apart from
one Neil notes in South Africa, have there been any productions with
white actresses in black face or with black actresses as Cleopatra?

Re: Shakespearean Sheet Music

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0509  Monday, 5 March 2001

From:           Ronnie I. Lakowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Mar 2001 11:37:55 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 12.0480 Shakespearean Sheet Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0480 Shakespearean Sheet Music

If you are not aware of it, there is a surprisingly detailed APPENDIX on
the Music in Twelfth Night edited by James Walker in Warren and Wells
edition of Twelfth Night (pp. 222-236 of the Oxford World's Classics
Paperback). Walker gives a detailed transcription of the musical scores
of all the earliest known settings of each of the songs in Twelfth
Night.

Ronnie I. Lakowski

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