Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: April ::
Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0825  Wednesday, 11 April 2001

[1]     From:   Steve Roth <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 10:04:53 -0700
        Subj:   Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

[2]     From:   Don Bloom <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 12:40:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Roth <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 10:04:53 -0700
Subject: 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

Marti Markus <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >

>Alfonso el Sabio (1221-1284) published one of the first European books
>on chess: "Libros de acedrex, dados e tablas"

>Why don't you try it once too, it's quite fun and it's very simple:
>Throw one die, and, let's say, with a 1 you are allowed to move a pawn,
>2 = rook, 3 = knight, 4 = bishop, 5 = Q, 6 = K;

Is this how el Sabio describes the game at that time? Is this how we
know it was played, or is the dice component a surmise? Just curious,
actually.

Fabulous post, by the way. Thanks.

Steve
http://princehamlet.com

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 12:40:31 -0500
Subject: 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

Clifford Stetner notes

>Anyone who played chess as a youth probably is aware that there are ways
>to cheat. They all involve the opponent taking his/her eyes off the
>board, at which point you can a) palm one of his/her pieces b) return
>one of your captured pieces to the board c) move a piece (yours or your
>opponent's).

Just so, especially C. (Pleasant to find myself agreeing with Clifford
for a change.) And Marti Markus's reminder of the dice-based version is
also timely in considering what is meant by cheating. It's much easier
to cheat when dice are involved

Two other notes: Chaucer's Franklin has the friends of Dorigen try to
get her mind off her troubles (loneliness and fear) by playing chess and
tables (backgammon).

And the sexual element latent in all competitive games between a woman
and a man, even such an intellectual game as chess, is used very
powerfully in "The Thomas Crown Affair" -- the original, I mean; I can't
speak to the re-make.

With castles in the air and windmills in the mind,

don

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.