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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: April ::
Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0842  Monday, 16 April 2001

[1]     From:   Vick Bennison <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Apr 2001 12:35:35 EDT
        Subj:   Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

[2]     From:   Marti Markus <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Apr 2001 18:13:20 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Vick Bennison <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Apr 2001 12:35:35 EDT
Subject: 12.0825 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0825 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

Probably an irrelevant point, but there are exactly 16 named characters
in Tempest (I'm not counting the Boatswain and Master, who are only
titled, not named), just the right amount to make up the back rows of a
chess game.  Then as pawns I suppose you have the Boatswain, Master,
spirits, shapes, reapers, nymphs, mariners and unnamed members of the
royal train.  If you feel we must include the Boatswain and Master in
the major players, then remove Ferdinand and Miranda, who are, after
all, playing the game.  ;^) I'd guess the white team would be Prospero,
Ariel, Miranda, Ceres, Juno, Iris, Ferdinand, and Gonzalo, with the
blacks being Alonso, Antonio, Sebastian, Francisco, Adrian, Caliban,
Trinculo and Stephano. ;^) White's move to open.

Vick

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marti Markus <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Apr 2001 18:13:20 +0100
Subject: 12.0825 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0825 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

> >Alfonso el Sabio (1221-1284) published one of the first European books
> >on chess: "Libros de acedrex, dados e tablas"
>
> >Why don't you try it once too, it's quite fun and it's very simple:
> >Throw one die, and, let's say, with a 1 you are allowed to move a pawn,
> >2 = rook, 3 = knight, 4 = bishop, 5 = Q, 6 = K;
>
> Is this how el Sabio describes the game at that time? Is this how we
> know it was played, or is the dice component a surmise? Just curious,
> actually.

Yes, it is - but I cheated a bit yesterday. I just quoted Cockburn, and
the suggestion how to play with dice was only as I vaguely remembered
it, I was too lazy to look it up. But I have actually got a bilingual
edition of Alfonso's book (Spanish/German), and I have found the
relevant passages now: (Alfonso el Sabio, Libros de Acedrex, Dados e
Tablas. Das Schachzabelbuch K

 

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