2001

Re: Tragic Hero

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0884  Wednesday, 18 April 2001

From:           Judith M. Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Apr 2001 01:07:49 -0400
Subject: 12.0869 Re: Tragic Hero
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0869 Re: Tragic Hero

Sean Lawrence has asserted that I

"might be confusing him [Bassanio] with Lancelot Gobbo, who is accused
of getting up the negro's belly in 3.5" when I wrote earlier that
Bassanio's previous sexual experience had made him a fortune-hunter
rather than a lover.

Again, I am away from my books and can't quote exactly, but the
reference is in the early part of the play when Bassanio says woefully
to Antonio that he had earlier lost his substance on "pregnant" ventures
that left him penniless.  His whole motive in coming to Antonio is to
recoup this lost fortune by marrying Portia, and he seeks an
introduction to be received by Portia through Antonio.  I know that
Antonio's sexuality is not mentioned in the play, but he is described in
the first scene as "sad" without knowing why.  I do believe that we have
endlessly discussed on this list that Antonio may be homosexual. I am
just suggesting that he may have had a lot of cheap women, on the model
of Bassanio, and that he is tired of having women that way but doesn't
particularly want to marry because it is so easy to get cheap women.
Now he is lonely and bored with sex.

This explanation for his "sadness" seems as plausible to me as the one
that he may be homosexual and fits the language of the play as well as
the conduct of young "wastrels."  The reference that I cannot quote from
memory is surely to the story of the "Prodigal Son" as I do believe the
word "prodigal" is mentioned in the exact quote.

Can anyone help me here?

Judy Craig

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Hamlet, Starring Simon Russell Beale

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0883  Wednesday, 18 April 2001

From:           Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Apr 2001 21:24:49 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Hamlet, Starring Simon Russell Beale

The production is a scandal, a gray streak of mediocrity, a lifeless
illustration of Macbeth's soliloquy on meaningless tomorrows.  Scene
after pallid scene is performed without conviction, energy or
commitment.  Peter McEnery's Claudius is a mild, professorial figure,
barely distinguishable from Polonius.  The other actors are worse, A
dusty light half-illumines the proceedings, turning Denmark into a
kingdom of ashes.

Hamlet at least should surge above this tepid wash, but Beale settles
happily into it, dog-paddling contentedly.  He is a short, fat, twitchy
fellow, with arms like little flippers.  He does not so much traverse
the stage as heave across it like a seal.  He has a notable tic,
scratching himself repeatedly on the head, chin, arms and chest.  His
congested voice and plummy diction make one think of a fop with catarrh.

At times Beale assumes a comically ghoulish expression, as if he were
playing Thersites.  Yet his habitual mien is one of nose-wrinkling
disgust.  Perhaps he is sniffing the rot that pervades Denmark, or
perhaps he is smelling his own performance.

Beale is soft-spoken and subdued to the point of monotony;
intellectually he seems slow on the uptake.  He tends to act in lengthy
pauses between lines, a bad habit that makes him appear sluggish.  One
reviewer has praised him for being "ordinary," as if that were
appropriate for Hamlet.  Others have commended his "gentle" and "humane"
qualities; but then danger and excitement are hardly to be expected from
a fat, graceless runt.  Pound for pound (and he has more than his
share), Beale is the most unattractive, uncharismatic, unexciting,
unmoving, uninteresting--ah well, let's just say it:  he's the worst
Hamlet I've ever seen.

Several seats down from me in the same row sat two boys, aged about 10
or 11.  They were intelligent, well-spoken and, before the curtain rose,
alert with excitement.  Then came the first scene:  heavily abridged,
cursorily staged, and acted in so perfunctory a manner that no one
unfamiliar with the play was likely to have followed it.  As each
wretched scene succeeded, with no actor exerting himself to seize the
audience's hearts or minds, the boys slumped lower and lower in their
seats, staring miserably at the floor, bludgeoned by disappointment.
They may well grow up to loathe and avoid Shakespeare; and who could
blame them?  There was once a time when Shakespearean productions moved,
consoled and exhilarated me; now they depress and disgust me beyond
measure.  I abandoned Beale's Hamlet at intermission thinking how weary,
stale, flat and unprofitable seem to me all the uses of this world.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Sir William Tiffany and Character Databases

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0881  Wednesday, 18 April 2001

From:           Ronnie I. Lakowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Apr 2001 16:51:18 -0600 (MDT)
Subject:        Sir William Tiffany and Character Databases

>I am wondering if you could suggest any database or reference book that
>allows one to search for theatrical references, particularly the names of
>characters.  The one I am trying to track down is a reference to a "Sir
>William Tiffany", which I suspect comes from a mid to late 18th century
>British play.  If you have any suggestion about how I might track this
>down, without reading through thousands of plays, I would be most
>appreciative.

The above request was forwarded to me by one of the librarians at UBC.
Please reply to me offlist and I will forward it to the librarian in
question.

           Ronnie I. Lakowski
           This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Re: Line Identification

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0882  Wednesday, 18 April 2001

[1]     From:   Brother Anthony <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Apr 2001 10:01:25 +0900
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0856 Line Identification

[2]     From:   Gary Allen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Apr 2001 22:07:01 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0856 Line Identification

[3]     From:   Ann Carrigan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Apr 2001 22:07:54 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0866 Re: Line Identification


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brother Anthony <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Apr 2001 10:01:25 +0900
Subject: 12.0856 Line Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0856 Line Identification

"And success attend it..." (or something like it) does not occur in
Shakespeare (Bartlett Concordance dixit)

What about the Prayer for Resignation to God's Will:

Lord, if what I seek be according to our will,
then let it come to pass
and let success attend the outcome.
But if not, my God,
let it not come to pass.
Do not leave me to my own devices,
for you know how unwise I can be.
Keep me safe under your protection Lord my God,
and in your own gentle way guide me
and rule me as you know best.

or perhaps one of the other 271 hits found by using Yahoo / Google...

Br Anthony

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gary Allen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Apr 2001 22:07:01 EDT
Subject: 12.0856 Line Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0856 Line Identification

Edna Z. Boris asks:

>Someone has asked me to identify where the following comes from: "And
>success attend it" - is the quote even accurate?

Could this be an Englished line from Virgil?  An online site at:

http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/jod/AG/allgre.340.html

gives it as:

macte nova virtute puer (Aen. ix. 641), success attend your valor, boy!

Gary

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ann Carrigan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Apr 2001 22:07:54 EDT
Subject: 12.0866 Re: Line Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0866 Re: Line Identification

Edna Z. Boris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

>Someone has asked me to identify where the following comes from: "And
>success attend it" - is the quote even accurate?  Not much to go on; if
>anyone can help, I'd be grateful.

Someone else looked for "success" and worked from there; I looked for
attachments to the word "attend".

Humphrey of Gloucester's departing lines after he relinquishes his staff
to Henry VI:

   Farewell, good King; when I am dead and gone,
   May honourable peace attend thy throne!   Exit (II.ii.)

At the end of Henry VIII, regarding the baby Elizabeth:

[CRANMER.]                  All princely graces
   That mould up such a mighty piece as this is,
   With all the virtues that attend the good,
   Shall still be doubled on her. (V.v.)

Portia's leave-taking from Belmont:

PORTIA. My people do already know my mind,
   And will acknowledge you and Jessica
   In place of Lord Bassanio and myself.
   So fare you well till we shall meet again.
 LORENZO. Fair thoughts and happy hours attend on you!
 JESSICA. I wish your ladyship all heart's content. (III.iv.)

Viola's leave-taking of Olivia:

   There lies your way, due west.
 VIOLA. Then westward-ho!
   Grace and good disposition attend your ladyship!  (III.i.)

But no "attend it" by itself. I don't know whether these help. I
particularly enjoyed being reminded of Lorenzo's line, "Fair thoughts
and happy hours attend on you!"

Peace and joy,
Ann Carrigan
_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Historical Accuracy and Thomas Cranmer

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0880  Wednesday, 18 April 2001

From:           Ronnie I. Lakowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Apr 2001 16:49:24 -0600 (MDT)
Subject:        Historical Accuracy and Thomas Cranmer

>Takashi Kozuka recommends,
>
>>To SHAKESPEReans who want to
>>know more about Cranmer [. . .] Diarmaid MacCulloch's Thomas
>>Cranmer: A Life (1996). (It's nearly 700 pages, though!)
>
>Those who want a review before plunging into the nearly 700 pages, might
>want to see mine, at EMLS:  http://www.shu.ac.uk/emls/04-3/lawrrev.html
>
>Cheers,
>Se


Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.