2001

Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0825  Wednesday, 11 April 2001

[1]     From:   Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 10:04:53 -0700
        Subj:   Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

[2]     From:   Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 12:40:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 10:04:53 -0700
Subject: 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

>Alfonso el Sabio (1221-1284) published one of the first European books
>on chess: "Libros de acedrex, dados e tablas"

>Why don't you try it once too, it's quite fun and it's very simple:
>Throw one die, and, let's say, with a 1 you are allowed to move a pawn,
>2 = rook, 3 = knight, 4 = bishop, 5 = Q, 6 = K;

Is this how el Sabio describes the game at that time? Is this how we
know it was played, or is the dice component a surmise? Just curious,
actually.

Fabulous post, by the way. Thanks.

Steve
http://princehamlet.com

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 12:40:31 -0500
Subject: 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0808 Re: Tempest, Renaissance Education and Chess

Clifford Stetner notes

>Anyone who played chess as a youth probably is aware that there are ways
>to cheat. They all involve the opponent taking his/her eyes off the
>board, at which point you can a) palm one of his/her pieces b) return
>one of your captured pieces to the board c) move a piece (yours or your
>opponent's).

Just so, especially C. (Pleasant to find myself agreeing with Clifford
for a change.) And Marti Markus's reminder of the dice-based version is
also timely in considering what is meant by cheating. It's much easier
to cheat when dice are involved

Two other notes: Chaucer's Franklin has the friends of Dorigen try to
get her mind off her troubles (loneliness and fear) by playing chess and
tables (backgammon).

And the sexual element latent in all competitive games between a woman
and a man, even such an intellectual game as chess, is used very
powerfully in "The Thomas Crown Affair" -- the original, I mean; I can't
speak to the re-make.

With castles in the air and windmills in the mind,

don

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Wedding of Sound and Image

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0824  Tuesday, 10 April 2001

From:           Jane Drake Brody <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 09:36:54 EDT
Subject:        Wedding of Sound and Image

>If there is actually a name for the wedding
>of sound and image, I'd be happy to know
>what it is.

I seem to recall that the poet Sidney Lanier refers to the wedding of
sound and image as "Syzygy."

Jane Drake Brody
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Hamlet on Screen

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0822  Tuesday, 10 April 2001

From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 13:00:57 +0100
Subject:        Hamlet on Screen

Arrangements have been finalized for the one-day Hamlet on Screen
conference at Shakespeare's Globe London on 28 April 2001, organized in
conjunction with King's College London. SHAKSPERians are invited to the
conference website at www.totus.org/hos where the programme and paper
abstracts may be read. The website also offers online registration to
the conference and a list of accommodation.

Gabriel Egan
Globe Education, Shakespeare's Globe, and King's College London

Tony Howard
University of Warwick

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RSC-This England

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0823  Tuesday, 10 April 2001

From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 09:11:28 -0400
Subject:        RSC-This England

>From today's Guardian

Marathon Shakespeare Drama-goers
flock to week of history plays

Maev Kennedy, arts and heritage correspondent
Tuesday April 10, 2001
The Guardian

Gentlemen and ladies of England now abed shall set their alarm clocks to
remind them: if it is Tuesday there are still seven plays, four kings,
three severed heads, two theatres and a gallon of stage blood to go, as
the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of all the Bard's history
plays, performed in chronological order, comes to town.

The production, This England - The Histories, is the first time a
professional company has staged the complete cycle within a week, though
the RSC and other companies have done them across a season.

It is already too late to lash out 


Re: Coleridge Explanation of Verse

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0821  Tuesday, 10 April 2001

From:           Brian Vickers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Apr 2001 10:30:20 +0200
Subject: 12.0803 Re: Coleridge Explanation of Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0803 Re: Coleridge Explanation of Verse

Just a footnote to the Coleridge poem 'Metrical Feet': the version
recently quoted is incomplete. The full text, which I found in John
Lennard's excellent *The Poetry Handbook* (Oxford, 1996) -- should be
recommended reading in all English departments -- is as follows:

     Trochee trips from long to short;
     From long to long in solemn sort
     Slow Spondee stalks; strong foot! yet ill able
     Ever to come up with Dactyl trisyllable.
     Iambics march from short to long; --
     With a leap and a bound the swift Anapaests throng;
     One syllable long, with one short at each side,
     Amphibrachys hastes with a stately stride; --
     First and last being long, middle short, Amphimacer
     Strikes his thundering hoofs like a proud high-bred Racer.

Brian Vickers

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