2001

Re: Feathers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0805  Monday, 9 April 2001

From:           Peterson-Kranz Karen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 8 Apr 2001 20:18:46 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.0777 Re: Feathers
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0777 Re: Feathers

David Evett writes of the red and white feathers:

> Looking
> back I can't construct a systematic set of symbolic
> meanings (which
> doesn't mean that there wasn't one); they mostly
> appeared at moments of
> death, and might, indeed, have been white for dead
> Yorkists and Red for
> Lancastrians.  Has anybody tried to ask Michael
> Boyd?

Given some recent conversations on other threads about "theory" and
"authorial intention," I'm tempted to ask why we should privilege Boyd's
interpretation of his own feathers over anyone else's interpretation?
(Don't everyone shout at me at once: the above was intended ironically.)

As to "a systematic set of symbolic meanings"... when I encountered the
following today in another context I remembered the RSC's feathers.
Could this iconographic description of the Icarus motif, from Whitney's
*Choice of Emblemes* (28), have any bearing on the white feathers(for
dead Yorkists) and the red feathers (for dead Lancastrians)?:

"Heare, ICARUS with mountinge up alofte,
Came headlonge downe, and fell into the Sea:
His waxed winges, the sonne did make so softe,
They melted straighte, and feathers fell awaie:
  So, whilste he flewe, and of no dowbte did care,
  He moov'de his armes, but loe, the same were bare.

Let suche beware, which paste theire reache doe
mounte,
Whoe seeke the thinges, to mortall men deny'de,
And searche the Heavens, and all the starres
accoumpte,
And tell therebie, what after shall betyde:
  With blusshinge nowe, theire weakenesse rightlie
weye,
  Least as they clime, they fall to theire decaye."

Yeah, it's a stretch, but...while we're waiting for comments from Boyd
it might do as well as anything else.

Cheers,
Karen Peterson

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Re: New Issue: Early Modern Culture

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0804  Monday, 9 April 2001

From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 08 Apr 2001 15:51:41
Subject:        Re: New Issue: Early Modern Culture

I keep receiving an error message that the website <
http://eserver.org/emc > is 'not responding' :-( Are other SHAKESPEReans
experiencing the same problem? Or am I the only one?

Best wishes,

Takashi Kozuka

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Re: Shakespeare's Grave

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0802  Monday, 9 April 2001

From:           Brother Anthony <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 Apr 2001 08:57:56 +0900
Subject: 12.0778 Re: Shakespeare's Grave
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0778 Re: Shakespeare's Grave

Lisa Guidarini seems to have come to the conclusion that all the members
of the SHAKSPER list believe and teach that Shakespeare was / is buried
in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Church. May I point out (as others no
doubt will) that the normally accepted, standard, official,
time-honoured account is that William Shakespeare was and has remained
buried inside the church, beneath the stone slabs forming the altar
steps in the chancel, under a stone with an inscription signifying "Do
not disturb", a place of honour which he was given as one of the
churchwardens. Confirmation of this is presumably given by the burial in
the same location of several other members of his family. No one has
surely ever suggested that the monument on the wall was the actual
burial place? I am not saying that this normal account is 200% certain;
but I have never heard that there are any convincing reasons for
discarding it.

Br Anthony
Sogang University, Seoul, Korea

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Re: Coleridge Explanation of Verse

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0803  Monday, 9 April 2001

From:           Stephanie Hughes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 8 Apr 2001 04:42:07 -0700
Subject: 12.0774 Re: Coleridge Explanation of Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0774 Re: Coleridge Explanation of Verse

>"Metrical Feet" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
>
>     Troche trips from long to short.
>     From long to long in solemn sort
>     Slow Spondee stalks; strong foot! yet ill able
>     Ever to come up with Dactyl trisyllable.
>     Iambics march from short to long;--
>     With a leap and a bound the swift anapests throng.

Slightly off-topic, but, oh well--I have always thought this nursery
rhyme the most perfect blend of sound and image I know: If there is
actually a name for the wedding of sound and image, I'd be happy to know
what it is.

Leg over leg as the dog went to Dover,
When he came to a stile, jump, he went over.

Stephanie Hughes

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EARLY THEATRE VOLUME 4

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0801  Monday, 9 April 2001

From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 5 Apr 2001 15:05:04 -0500
Subject:        EARLY THEATRE VOLUME 4

EARLY THEATRE has now posted the preliminary table of contents,
abstracts, and short biographies for Volume 4 (2001); a few more items
will be added over the next couple of months.

To view the full listing, go to
http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~reed/early

We also have a new email address for subscription orders:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


                               Volume 4, 2001


------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTICLES

'"Arden winketh at his wife's lewdness, &
why!": a patrilineal crisis in Arden of       Randall Martin
Faversham'

"Patrons and Travelling Companies in
Warwickshire"                                   Elza Tiner

'"The Precious Body of Christ That They
Tretyn in Ther Hondis": "Miraclis Pleyinge"       Heather
and the Croxton Play of the Sacrament'         Hill-Vasquez

"Timing Theatrical Action in the English          Philip
Medieval Theatre"                               Butterworth

'"Once More Unto the Breach": Katharine's
Victory in Henry V'                            Corinne Abate


------------------------------------------------------------------------

ISSUES IN REVIEW

To be announced


------------------------------------------------------------------------

BOOK REVIEWS


------------------------------------------------------------------------

John H. Astington, English Court Theatre 1558-1642. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 1999. Reviewed by William Ingram.

W. R. Elton, Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida and the Inns of Court
Revels. Aldershot and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 2000. Reviewed by Peter
Hyland.

Jody Enders, The Medieval Theater of Cruelty: Rhetoric, Memory,
Violence.
Ithaca and London: Cornell UP, 1999. Reviewed by David Bevington.

Clare Harraway, Re-citing Marlowe: Approaches to the Drama. Aldershot
and
Brookfield, VT: Ashgate, 2000. Reviewed by Judith Weil.

Walter Hodges, Enter the Whole Army: A Pictorial Study of Shakespearean
Staging, 1576-1616. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Reviewed by
Roslyn Knutson.

Michal Kobialka, This is My Body: Representational Practices in the
Early
Middle Ages. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999. Reviewed by
Lawrence Clopper.

Linda McJannet, The Voice of Elizabethan Stage Directions: The Evolution
of
a Theatrical Code. Newark: University of Delaware Press; London:
Associated
University Presses, 1999. Reviewed by R. A. Foakes.

Scott McMillin and Sally-Beth Maclean, The Queen's Men and their Plays.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Reviewed by A. R.
Braunmuller.

Mitchell B. Merback. The Thief, the Cross and the Wheel. Chicago:
University
of Chicago Press, 1999. Reviewed by Garrett Epp.

John Southworth, Fools and Jesters at the English Court. Stroud,
Gloucestershire: Sutton Publishing, 1998. Reviewed by Phebe Jensen.

_______________________________________________________________
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