2001

Shakespearean Acting Workshops?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0967  Friday, 27 April 2001

From:           Mary Tickel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Apr 2001 19:31:10 EDT
Subject:        Shakespearean Acting Workshops?

Dear All,

I recently heard of a series of workshop sessions in England called
MASTERCLASS, which covers the performing arts.  In the past they have
had workshops on the theater, as well as "Shakespeare and Verse," a
workshop on Shakespearean acting.

Are there workshops or classes available in North America on
Shakespearean acting for the acting beginner?  Are there any available
over the summer?  Does such a species exist?

Sincerely,
Mary Tickel

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: Wedding of Sound and Image

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0966  Friday, 27 April 2001

From:           Stephanie Hughes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Apr 2001 12:07:53 -0700
Subject: 12.0950 Re: Wedding of Sound and Image
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0950 Re: Wedding of Sound and Image

>Writing of
>
>Leg over leg as the dog went to Dover,
>When he came to a stile, jump, he went over.
>
>Stephanie Hughes says 'Every single sound in this replicates the meaning
>. . .'
>
>No it doesn't. How can the sound of  'leg', or 'as', or 'the', or 'dog'
>or any of these words 'replicate the meaning' of anything?
>
>T. Hawkes

No doubt my description fell short. Here's another try.

The rhythm of "Leg over leg" sounds like a four-footed animal running.
The following words continue to describe the action while maintaining
the same running rhythm. With "jump" the dog leaps over the stile, then
with "he went over" he continues to run in the same rhythm. Apart from
such prosy description, is there any language for describing this kind
of rhythmically onomotopoetic writing?

My father used to make the sound of a horse running by slapping first
one hand against one thigh, then the other against the other thigh, then
the two hands together. When done rapidly, this sounds like a horse
galloping in the same rhythm as the nursery rhyme. One of the morsels
left from the "oral tradition," and probably soon to be completely gone.
(For oh, the hobby horse is forgot!)

Stephanie Hughes

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Re: Filmic Lears

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0964  Friday, 27 April 2001

From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Apr 2001 12:49:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 12.0930 Re: Filmic Lears
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0930 Re: Filmic Lears

Gabriel writes:

>Just to clarify: virtually all domestic video-tapes are VHS (Betamax
>being the defeated rival standard), and it's "PAL encoding" you want in
>order for it to be "UK video-friendly". The good news is that there's no
>longer a need to worry about this: all UK video players made in the last
>4 years play US tapes (encoded in NTSC) as well as UK ones (encoded in
>PAL).

Unfortunately, Godard's Lear has been out of print in North America for
the past 4 years, so the title isn't available in NTSC format, either.

Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick Shakespeare Multimedia Catalogue
www.bardcentral.com

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Argumentation Site

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0965  Friday, 27 April 2001

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Apr 2001 11:29:10 -0700
Subject:        Argumentation Site

A message for those who teach critical thinking and argumentation, and
maybe a couple of other list members who can use a bit of help with
their posts.  I was just shown a web site that may be of interest.  I
only spent about 5 minutes with it, but my first impression is that this
is a good resource for exposing critical thinking and argumentation
mistakes.

http://www.don-lindsay-archive.org/skeptic/arguments.html#cause

All the best,
Mike Jensen

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: Young Marcellus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0963  Friday, 27 April 2001

From:           David Wilson-Okamura <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Apr 2001 11:37:08 -0500
Subject: 12.0951 Re: Young Marcellus
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0951 Re: Young Marcellus

At 10:55 AM 4/26/01 -0400, Don Bloom wrote:

>I won't pick out the individual responsible, but one of the respondents
>to the "Young Marcellus" query referred to Octavius as Octavian. This
>usage has bothered me ever since my third year Latin teacher (who knew
>more Latin than I ever will) did so many years ago. In the way that
>Latin words are usually Englished, Octavian would be short for
>Octavianus in the way that Julian is short for Julianus (not Julius).

N.S. Gill, the Ancient History guide at About.com, explains this
practice concisely as follows: "Augustus, originally Octavius, assumed
the name Octavian upon his adoption by Julius Caesar, and then the title
of Augustus after he disposed of the other major political powers and
assumed control of Rome."

Octavian is, as you note, English for Octavianus.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

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