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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: May ::
Re: Time in Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1077  Wednesday, 9 May 2001

[1]     From:   Andrew W. White <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 May 2001 16:43:48 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1057 Re: Time in Hamlet

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 May 2001 22:18:16 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1057 Re: Time in Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew W. White <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 May 2001 16:43:48 -0400
Subject: 12.1057 Re: Time in Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1057 Re: Time in Hamlet

Southampton's resemblance?  What about the Earl of Essex?  After all, he
referred to himself as a 'prince,' fell from the Queen's favor and,
after a bloody trip overseas (to Ireland, where Shakespeare's Henry V
rather ahistorically went to fight) confronted her in her closet?

Sorry if this is a repeat of a previous question, but I think Essex,
being a friend of the company, would have been just as likely a model as
any.  Especially after that disastrous gig with _Richard II_ on the eve
of Essex' coup?

Andy White

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 May 2001 22:18:16 -0400
Subject: 12.1057 Re: Time in Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1057 Re: Time in Hamlet

As I have argued here previously, the confusion of Hamlet's age is not
the result of faulty textual transmission but of the premodern
psychoanalytic themes of the play.  The F1 line you cite: "I have bin
sixeteene/heere, man and Boy thirty yeares." F1:3351 is a glaring clue
as to the internationality of this confusion (i.e. sixteen for sexton).
The ages 30 and 16 are emphasized by the dual identity "man and boy."
Shakespeare must have remarked what Freud would later characterize as
the phenomenon of regression in which certain neuroses can be understood
to replicate previous stages of the ego's development.  Hamlet is a
thirty old man caught in an adolescent conflict which in turn goes back
to an infantile trauma.  The unconscious nature of this regression drama
and the ego conflicts it creates on the level of consciousness are
replicated by the ambiguity of the surface text and the deep analysis
necessary to illuminate it, including probing the earlier quarto
describing the adolescent Hamlet for clues.

>Again, I'd love to hear feedback on the more extensive and (in my
>opinion) cohesive arguments at:
>
>http://princehamlet.com/chapter_1.html
>  and
>http://princehamlet.com/chap2.html
>
>And in Chapter Four, I discuss at length an aspect of Hamlet's character
>that we Hamlet lovers have been loath to admit--as a supercilious and
>somewhat contemptible son of a bxxxx in the mold of Southampton (and
>even more so, Oxford), et al.

To supercilious and contemptible I would add narcissistic and in dire
need of psychoanalysis.

Clifford

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