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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: May ::
Re: Why Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1234  Friday, 25 May 2001

[1]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 May 2001 20:56:23
        Subj:   Re: Why Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 May 2001 13:26:41 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1209 Re: Why Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 20:56:23
Subject:        Re: Why Shakespeare

>[NB. Terence Hawkes, please look away now]

Don't worry, Simon, I just saw him having lunch in the famous
fish-n-chip shop in Stratford :D (Terence Hawkes, That Shakespeherian
Rag (1986))

Takashi Kozuka

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
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Date:           Friday, 25 May 2001 13:26:41 +0100
Subject: 12.1209 Re: Why Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1209 Re: Why Shakespeare

What always astounds me about the writing of Shakespeare - and what puts
him above and beyond the rest - is his unflagging fairness.  The good
and evil; the tame and the wild; the dumb and the smart; old and young -
all get an equal equal shake from his exquisite pen.  Many modern
writers would do well to notice this clear and striking aspect.  No-one
debates as to whether Germaine Greer is a feminist or not, therefore her
views on women, if not entertaining, are completely predictable.  Some
writers are openly left-wing, some are right, others determined to
express any socio-political view no matter what.  Shakespeare threw
people he knew onto the stage and let them fight it out - rather like
the Bear Garden just down the road.  It was the audience that decided
then, and still does.

SAM

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