2001

Re: Parallel Texts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1006  Wednesday, 2 May 2001

From:           Billy Houck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 1 May 2001 12:01:59 EDT
Subject: 12.0995 Re: Parallel Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0995 Re: Parallel Texts

In a message dated 5/1/01 8:37:42 AM, David Nicol  writes:

>Does anyone know if these texts are still being used in schools? And are
>they a good thing or a bad thing...?

These parallel texts do, indeed, still exist, and they are used, and
they do dumb it down. I have a class set that translate "wherefore art
thou Romeo" to "Romeo, where are you?"

Needless to say, I do not use this set. They lie bound in a dark room.

Billy Houck
Arroyo Grande High School
California

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SSE Tours: 2002 Performances at 2001 Rates

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1005  Wednesday, 2 May 2001

From:           Shenandoah Shakespeare Express <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 1 May 2001 11:29:21 EDT
Subject:        SSE Tours: 2002 Performances at 2001 Rates

All 2002 Shenandoah Shakespeare Express residencies will be booked at
2001 rates until 30 June 2001.  As of 1 July 2001, the 2002 rate sheet
will be in effect for all 2002 performances and workshops.  The SSE
still has the following availability on its 2001/2002 touring schedule,
through the Spring of 2002:

2001/2002 Blush and Swoon Tour
(THE WINTER'S TALE, AS YOU LIKE IT, ROMEO AND JULIET)

29 September 2001       Indiana/Illinois Region
4 March 2002            West Virginia Region
11 March 2002           West Virginia Region
18 March 2002           Upper Mid-Atlantic/New England (Between Virginia
and New York)

2001/2002 Bright Heaven of Invention Tour
(HENRY V, THE COMEDY OF ERRORS, SAINT JOAN by George Bernard Shaw)

2 October 2001          Ohio Region
29-31 October 2001      Florida/Georgia/Alabama/South Carolina Region
28-30 November 2001     Maryland Region
1-16 December 2001      Mid-Atlantic Region
January 2002            TBA
4-6 February 2002       Mid-Atlantic Corridor (between Virginia and
Missouri)
18 February 2002        Upper Midwest Region (Iowa/Minnesota/Wisconsin)
25-26 February 2002     Michigan Region

2002 Beguile the Rich Tour
(THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST, MACBETH)

1 March 2002            South Carolina Region
7 March 2002            Alabama
15 March 2002           Eastern Texas
10-14 April 2002        Midwest
18-19 April 2002        Midwest
27-29 April 2002        Virginia

Interested venues should contact Bill Gordon, Shenandoah Shakespeare
Director of Tour Operations at (540) 885-5588, or via e-mail at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Bill Gordon
Director of Tour Operations
Shenandoah Shakespeare
11 East Beverley Street, Suite #31
Staunton, VA   24401-4322
Telephone (540) 885-5588
Fax  (540) 885-4886
www.shenandoahshakespeare.com
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: Copyrights

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1003  Wednesday, 2 May 2001

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 1 May 2001 15:44:46 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0982 Copyrights

[2]     From:   Richard Bear <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 01 May 2001 08:40:17 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0982 Copyrights


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 1 May 2001 15:44:46 +0100
Subject: 12.0982 Copyrights
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0982 Copyrights

Karen Peterson-Kranz wrote

>The SHARP-L list website runs the following on the page
>introducing its searchable archive.  I wonder if SHAKSPER
>should consider something similar:
>. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .>
>"Making these archives available to the scholarly community
>via SHARP Web in no way implies, however, that they are in
>the public domain or are unprotected by the laws of copyright.
>To the contrary: in making use of them you must always
>remember that THE COPYRIGHT OF EACH POSTED
>MESSAGE BELONGS TO ITS AUTHOR.
>
>"If you would like to quote from or reproduce a SHARP-L posting
>in an article or monograph or anywhere else, please request
>permission from its author and include a citation to its source.
>Guides to citation of electronic sources such as the ones by
>Nancy Crane and Xia Li and Melvin Page can help with the
>format of this essential scholarly courtesy."
>
>Just a thought, perhaps for the future if not now.

I oppose this suggestion for two reasons:

1) It's untrue. Everybody knows that putting something on the web is, de
facto, giving it away. That's why we're not supposed to put Time
Warner's stuff on our websites without permission.

2) I don't want to have get permission to quote SHAKSPER postings, any
more than I want to get permission to quote from journals or books. Fair
dealing "for the purposes of criticism or review" already covers this.

Reducing copyright restrictions is good for academia, where individuals
are mostly not living off their royalties.

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Bear <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 01 May 2001 08:40:17 -0700
Subject: 12.0982 Copyrights
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0982 Copyrights

That's true, email is automatically copyrighted by the originator
regardless of notification thereof.

Less well known is that emails originating at publicly owned
institutions, such as the one you are now reading (University of
Oregon), are automatically archived as public documents, including notes
to your sweetheart, etc. The delete key has no effect on this. Think of
the plots even now unfolding for some future Bard to freely read and
transform!

rb

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: Hoffman's MND

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1004  Wednesday, 2 May 2001

From:           Jim Lusardi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Apr 2001 17:44:24 -0400
Subject: 12.0905 Hoffman's MND (1999)
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0905 Hoffman's MND (1999)

Dear Eva D.:

For Samuel Crowl's review of Hoffman MND, see Shakespeare Bulletin 17.3
(Summer 1999): 41-42.

Jim l., Co-Editor, SB

>I am currently writing my final paper for University. It's a film
>analysis of Hoffman's (starladden) 1999 version of MND.
>
>I know that the film has briefly been a topic on the list in 1999 and
>(not having been a subscriber back then) was able to have a look at the
>relevant postings on the website (brill work, Eric, thanks!).  Still, I
>wandered whether any of you would like to share any new ideas or
>insights (or to raise more questions) concerning the film.
>
>I am (obviously?) most interested in Bottom and the special role he
>plays in Hoffman's version. And what about Mrs Bottom?  What about the
>bicycles? Clever conceit or cheap farce?
>
>Anything you can think of will be welcome.
>
>I'm also desperately seeking some more detailed information on the
>director's cv and formation which seems to be rather difficult to find.
>There isn't anything much on the IMDB and I haven't found much on the
>Internet in general.
>
>Thanks for any suggestions.
>
>Greetings from Aachen, Germany,
>Eva Dikow

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: Ariel's Gender

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1002  Tuesday, 1 May 2001

[1]     From:   Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 01 May 2001 04:17:51 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0978 Re: Ariel's Gender

[2]     From:   Florence Amit <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 1 May 2001 00:10:33 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0978 Re: Ariel's Gender


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 01 May 2001 04:17:51 +0100
Subject: 12.0978 Re: Ariel's Gender
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0978 Re: Ariel's Gender

> <Ariel is the name of a seraph. It means God's lion - <without gender, I
> <would say.
>
> In my essay on "The Tempest" ("Spirit Prison in a Tree:  Metamorphoses
> from Ovid to 'The Tempest' in "Providence: Studies in Western
> Civilization," Fall/Winter 1999), I have asserted that Ariel is a name
> for "hero" or "mountain (lion?) of god" taken from Isaiah 29:1-7:

In our parts of Europe ARIEL is a washing powder  -- or a fairy liquid.
It is very difficult to attach a gender to these things.

On the one hand, one would think that washing etc. is a traditionally
female occupation in our part of the world (not in reality -- it is me
who does the washing in our household -- but according to tradition). On
the other hand, there is also "Meister Proper", another powerful
cleaning powder or liquid, and clearly male.

In Stefan Bachmann's production of the Tempest in Basel, somebody (a
fairy?  / male or female?) crossed the stage with a packet of ARIEL (the
powder version) in his (or her?) hands. What I found a very bad and
silly joke now turns out to become more and more significant in the
light of this discussion. "Ariel w


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