2001

Hamlet in the Senate

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1229  Friday, 25 May 2001

From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 14:30:47 -0400
Subject:        Hamlet in the Senate

>From Grace Newton in Salon's Table Talk:

"Alas, poor Trent Lott! I knew him, Rushfoul: a fellow
of infinite bile, of most excellent menace: he hath
whipped me back on his path a thousand times; and now, how
abhorrent in my imagination he is! my gorge rims at it.
Here hung that ass that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your
bribes now? your rants? your froth? your flashes of evil scheming, that
were
wont to set the Capitol on a roar?"

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Re: Colorblindness

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1228  Friday, 25 May 2001

From:           Pat Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 13:14:50 -0500
Subject: 12.1200 Re: Colorblindness
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1200 Re: Colorblindness

> such consideration is aesthetic, not "racist." This
> is the position which prevails throughout the film industry

Surely the consideration in the film industry is primarily economic, not
aesthetic? Why on earth else cast an Australian movie star as a Scot?
(Or, for that matter, as a Danish prince.)

In any case, I don't think that just because a consideration is
aesthetic it cannot also be racist.

I never said that the response that Messrs.. Weiss and Weinstein claim
to have in the theatre is reprehensible. I said that it's neither
natural nor necessary. I happen to think that the system that gives rise
to the response is reprehensible, but that's different. And I'll remind
you all that I'm self-aware enough to chart similar responses in myself.

I think I've said everything I can say that's useful on this subject.
I'll let others have the last words. If you disagree and then don't hear
a response from me it's neither because I disrespect you and your
argument, nor is it because the force of your logic has silenced me.

Cheers,
Pat
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Re: Tragic Hero

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1226  Friday, 25 May 2001

[1]     From:   Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 May 2001 13:10:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Tragic Hero

[2]     From:   Florence Amit <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 May 2001 13:46:12 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1199 Re: Tragic Hero


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 13:10:58 -0400
Subject:        Re: Tragic Hero

Terence Hawkes is right: Stephanie Hughes (and Florence Amit) march to
the beat of their own drummers. They have every right to do so. If other
contributors to the list have exposed what they consider to be
shortcomings or contradictions in the views of Ms. Hughes and Ms. Amit,
the act of stating such shortcomings or contradictions should be enough.
Anything more is just piling on.

I also think that Sean mistakes Terence Hawkes's dry, British wit for
"pomposity." The two can sound alike to the untrained, Canadian ear.

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Florence Amit <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 13:46:12 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.1199 Re: Tragic Hero
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1199 Re: Tragic Hero

The requested textual references are easy for me to supply. The problem
is not that. It lies with the recipient being receptive to a
non-establishment interpretation and in accepting that the means to read
it is usually not openly supplied by the characters concerned, who are
playing a game of deception.  (according to my reading). Particularly
defeating is an un-abating tendency by the dominant culture, on stage
and off,  until this very day, to misinterpret anything that will not
represent itself in a flattering way. How could Shakespeare favor
Shylock over Solanio and Salario? Perish the thought. So I will give you
a few references, once again. Although my question becomes, will they be
considered at all?  Ms. Bonomi said in no uncertain terms, "never"- that
I should disappear and with me my texts and my supposed motives. Ask
her. However I shall endeavor to supply your request for act, scene and
line in a professional way.

Salario says he saw Bassanio and Gratiano under sail" is III,i,1,2 and
Jessica takes a sea voyage with Lorenzo. All of them end up in Belmont.
Obviously, Belmont therefore, is not a suburb of Venice. I do not think
it is in prejudicial Genoa III,i,72,  which name is put to mislead
Shylock's adversaries. So where is it? I know from history books where
it should be and Shakespeare compliments history. Launcelet has got a
"Negro" with child: a local girl of Montenegro, surely. Belmont, (the
name of a great center in Portugal for Marrano culture) is in the
Ottoman held Balkans where crypto Jews were free from the threat of the
inquisition. The placing corresponds to Portia's procedures III,iv, 84,
to arrive in Venice for the trial. After a land journey she must takes
the ferry III,iv, 53 to Padua , which is on an  estuary that is close to
Venice. She uses her servant's, Balathazar, identity. (His name suffix
spelled with a z means "returned" and "helper" in Hebrew. The text can
change the z to an s for another meaning.). He returns and she goes in
his stead.

Florence Amit

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Re: Hinman Collator

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1227  Friday, 25 May 2001

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 May 2001 18:51:50 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1204 Re: Hinman Collator

[2]     From:   Susanne Collier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 May 2001 17:05:28 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1204 Re: Hinman Collator


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 18:51:50 +0100
Subject: 12.1204 Re: Hinman Collator
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1204 Re: Hinman Collator

> And it's widely accepted in Britain
> that the model for James Bond was F. R. Leavis.
>
> Terence Hawkes

Does that make Q Queenie or Quiller Couch?

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susanne Collier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 17:05:28 -0700
Subject: 12.1204 Re: Hinman Collator
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1204 Re: Hinman Collator

F R Leavis as James Bond? Leavis sure is getting around posthumously; he
"appears" (off camera) in Bridget Jones Diary.   O.K. I'll bite; are you
serious, Terence?

Best,
Susanne Collier

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Re: Irving and Terry Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1225  Friday, 25 May 2001

From:           Randall Martin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 May 2001 13:53:37 -0300
Subject: 12.1211 Papers of Henry Irving and Ellen Terry
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1211 Papers of Henry Irving and Ellen Terry

Thomas Larque wrote:

>Does any SHAKSPERian happen to know whether there is any institution (or
>amenable private collector) in London or the South-East who holds the
>"Papers of Henry Irving and Ellen Terry" microfilm and might be willing
>to allow an independent researcher to study it?  Failing that, does
>anybody know of any British institution that holds the microfilm and
>might be willing to send it as an inter-library loan?

If you live in Kent, you might try The Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in
Smallhythe.  They hold some of Terry's original papers, and so might
have the microfilm you are after.  When I did some research there about
ten years ago, a Mrs Weare was very helpful.

Randall Martin
Department of English,
University of New Brunswick

_______________________________________________________________
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