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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: December ::
Re: Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2785  Saturday, 10 December 2001

[1]     From:   Brother Anthony <
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        Date:   Saturday, 08 Dec 2001 10:01:10 +0900
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism

[2]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Friday, 7 Dec 2001 20:10:33 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism

[3]     From:   Brother Anthony <
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        Date:   Saturday, 08 Dec 2001 10:41:44 +0900
        Subj:   Plagiarism

[4]     From:   Jack Hettinger <
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        Date:   Sunday, 9 Dec 2001 13:25:09 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brother Anthony <
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Date:           Saturday, 08 Dec 2001 10:01:10 +0900
Subject: 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism

Eric Weil wrote: "The pleasure of nailing the cheaters was short-lived,
soon replaced by sadness and disappointment. I do hope they learned
something more than 'Don't retake the class with Weil'." I think that
the very thought-provoking article from the Chronicle of Higher
Education which was made available by Ed Kranz through that VERY long
link (allowing non-subscribers to see it) takes us in rather different
and possibly more helpful directions. It suggests that we are not being
helped by notions of "cheating" (as in poker? a URL = a card up the
sleeve?) and that the second phrase quoted might have to be rephrased:
"I feel that I learned something, and that the ways I have been teaching
composition will have to be radically changed in order to take account
of the reality of the Web and also to respect the quite legitimate
loathing many young people feel on being asked to write in ways that are
not natural to them about topics they have no interest in, in hours that
would be better spent in other ways."

I confess that I have a long way to go in this, still give a rather
higher grade to students who write their own thoughts in their own
words, and even penalize students whose "papers" are not only obviously
entirely lifted from the Web but do not correspond in content with what
was required. But it is easier to distinguish things when the writers
are not "native speakers" of English; correct use of articles is a
give-away.

I was once thrilled to find a really good Chaucer essay by one student
and it was only when I was on page 3 that it struck me that it was too
good. A search for a few words on Yahoo led me to the source, on my own
home page, a text written by myself some years before. Asked to comment,
the student explained that my words expressed exactly what she wanted to
say, only so much better than she could put it herself... Well, why not?
At least she had read what I had written (I think).

Brother Anthony
Sogang University, Seoul, Korea
http://www.sogang.ac.kr/~anthony

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Friday, 7 Dec 2001 20:10:33 EST
Subject: 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism

In my view, it is the offensive nature of North American higher
education wherein margins are measured, footnotes not only checked but
also required that is at fault by encouraging the droppings of names and
the comparison of the students' own views with "published" material and
the use of what is loosely called authority. The meanest thought must
look like some PMLA paper, but unhappily not only in appearance.

    We are what we eat, as is well known.

Harry Hill

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brother Anthony <
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Date:           Saturday, 08 Dec 2001 10:41:44 +0900
Subject:        Plagiarism

People whose mail readers could not deal with the long URL for that
article by Rebecca Moore Howard in the Chronicle of Higher Education on
Plagiarism, and would like to read it, will find a clickable link to it
as the last item on my page of Humanities and Computing links at
http://www.sogang.ac.kr/~anthony/HumComp.htm

Brother Anthony

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Hettinger <
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Date:           Sunday, 9 Dec 2001 13:25:09 -0500
Subject: 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.2775 Re: Plagiarism

For a long while I have required students to turn in, with their papers
and presentations, photocopies of the articles and relevant passages
from books that they consult, quote, and paraphrase.

At first, I was hunting for plagiarism. Always, I think, the offending
student and I have worked out meaningful ways to mend.

But I soon realized another and equally important benefit of reviewing
even very good students' research material: observing how much they
misread sources, confound paraphrases, miss ironies, and otherwise
commit the thousand natural shlocks that undergraduate scholarship is
heir to.

What I have learnt has helped me design much more interesting projects
to advance students' abilities.

Jack

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