Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: December ::
Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2788  Monday, 10 December 2001

[1]     From:   Aubrey Chan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 07 Dec 2001 23:55:37 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2745 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World

[2]     From:   Dan Smith <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 8 Dec 2001 02:11:03 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2777 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World

[3]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 07 Dec 2001 19:15:45 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2777 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Aubrey Chan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 07 Dec 2001 23:55:37 +0000
Subject: 12.2745 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World?
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2745 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World?

Did anyone remember the 10 novels that Somerset Maugham chose for his
book "??Ten Novels"?

Aubrey Chan
San Francisco

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dan Smith <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 8 Dec 2001 02:11:03 -0000
Subject: 12.2777 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2777 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World

I know nothing of the Ring Cycle but I am aware that Star Wars was
consciously based on the writings of Joseph Campbell.  Campbell felt
that there were powerful common themes that arose consistently in
mythologies all around the world and one of these was that of the hero
path.  As to why hero path myths arise in all ages and places, there is
one reference, among many in his work, in his book Occidental Mythology
(p. 24) in which he wrote about "the force of the cosmic order itself,
the dark mystery of time...pressing on, ever turning in its circle of
eternal return...getting absolutely nowhere. // Against the symbol of
this undying power the warrior principle of the great deed of the
individual who matters flung its bolt".  Perhaps throughout human
history we have rightly perceived ourselves to be alone in a vast
universe and looked to myths concerning lives that matter, that make a
difference.  This, in turn, reminds me of  The Hitchhiker's Guide to the
Galaxy (Douglas Adams, gone but not forgotten) in which a torture was to
immerse someone in a vast 3D image of the universe with a sign saying
"you are here" to indicate their complete insignificance.  This reduced
everyone to mush except the 'hero' Zaphod Beeblebrox who said something
to the effect of "Hey, Cool".  The Hitchhiker's Guide is not on any
quoted list of Eight Literary Wonders but it looks good to this
beholder. Of course you may disagree...

Dan Smith

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 07 Dec 2001 19:15:45 -0800
Subject: 12.2777 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2777 Re: Eighth Wonder of the Literary World

Martin Steward asks,

>Does anyone else find it
>strange that the Star Wars trilogy / tetralogy / nonalogy, so obviously
>meant as Der Ring Des Nibelungen on film in space, enjoys the same kind
>of cultural dominance in the West in 2001 as Der Ring Des Nibelungen did
>in 1901? What does this tell us about the imperatives of mythopoesis? Or
>indeed the about what has become of Western culture over the past
>hundred years....?

As long as it doesn't tell us where we're going in the next thirteen
years...

Peace,
Se

 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.