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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: December ::
Re: Cold Ghosts
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2790  Monday, 10 December 2001

[1]     From:   Kevin J. Donovan <
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        Date:   Friday, 7 Dec 2001 15:13:54 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2780 Re: Cold Ghosts

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Saturday, 8 Dec 2001 11:49:45 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2780 Re: Cold Ghosts


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin J. Donovan <
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Date:           Friday, 7 Dec 2001 15:13:54 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 12.2780 Re: Cold Ghosts
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2780 Re: Cold Ghosts

I don't remember who posted the original query about whether the
presence of ghosts was supposed to induce the experience of coldness in
early modern poetry and drama.  But a "shivering sweat" is the result of
the presence of a ghost in Middleton & Rowley's _The Changeling_
(5.1.62-4), while in Donne's "The Apparition" the presence of the ghost
produces "a cold quicksilver sweat" (l. 12).

Kevin Donovan <
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English Department, Middle Tennessee State University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Saturday, 8 Dec 2001 11:49:45 -0000
Subject: 12.2780 Re: Cold Ghosts
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2780 Re: Cold Ghosts

Ruth Ross wrote,

> The repetition of "cold" images is also Shakespeare's
> way of communicating temperature/mood/setting to an
> audience with a minimum of props and no lighting other
> than natural light (at 2 o'clock in the afternoon so the sun
> would hit the stage at the right angle)!

The evidence of Wenceslaus Hollar's sketch of the second Globe (which
had the same groundplan as the first) is that stage was in the
south-west quadrant of the yard. There the afternoon sun could not hit
it; rather the galleries opposite the stage would be lit. R. B. Graves
_Lighting the Shakespearean stage, 1567-1642_ (Carbondale: Illinois
University Press, 1999) pp. 88-92 summarizes the evidence for the
orientation of the stage for each of the theatres.

Gabriel Egan

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