2001

Pop Culture: The Bard and Civil Rights

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2755  Wednesday, 5 December 2001

From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Dec 2001 01:40:55 -0500
Subject:        Pop Culture: The Bard and Civil Rights

>From Molly Ivins' column, 12/4/01, "Ashcroft Unhinged:"

"Some of us are making lists and checking them twice to see who stood
with us on this particular St. Crispin's Day. And when next we see you
Federalist Society types at some debate over, say, strict construction,
we'll be happy to remind you how much you really care when the chips are
down. With the honorable exception of the libertarian right (William
Safire, Rep. Bob Barr), the entire conservative movement is missing in
action, and so are a lot of pious liberals."

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

TOC: Ben Jonson Journal, Volume 8

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2754  Wednesday, 5 December 2001

From:           This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Dec 2001 23:25:01 EST
Subject:        TOC: Ben Jonson Journal, Volume 8

for information on past volumes, include the special double-volume 7,
please visit www.benjonsonjournal.com

THE BEN JONSON JOURNAL
Literary Contexts in the Age of Elizabeth,
James, and Charles

VOLUME 8 / 2001

JOURNAL POLICIES / vii

EDITORS' PAGE / ix

THE BEN JONSON JOURNAL FORUM / xi

"BEN JONSON AT BREAKFAST" / xiii

ARTICLES

IAN DONALDSON
Looking Sideways: Jonson, Shakespeare, and the Myths of Envy / 1

PAUL A. CANTOR
In Defense of the Marketplace: Spontaneous Order in Jonson's Bartholomew
Fair / 23

NOEL BLINCOE
Bartholmew Fayre: A Celebration of English Folk Festivals  / 65

BARBARA IRENE KREPS
Contract and Property Law in The Devil Is an Ass  / 85

ROBERT W. HALLI, JR.
Versifying the Metaphor: Ben Jonson's "Song. That Women are bvt Mens
shaddowes" / 123

HANNA SCOLNICOV
The Merchant in Volpone: Narrative and Conceptual Montage in Maurice
Tourneur's Film / 133

CARLO M. BAJETTA
The Manuscripts of Verse Presented to Elizabeth I: A Preliminary
Investigation  / 147

CHRISTINE E. HUTCHINS
"Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman?": England as Anti-Type
of Rome in Elizabethan Print and Julius Caesar / 207

JOHN JOWETT
The Audacity of Measure for Measure in 1621 / 229

JOHN C. KERRIGAN
Action and Confession, Fate and Despair in the Violent Conclusion of The
Duchess of Malfi / 249

CLIFFORD DAVIDSON
The Anglican Setting of Richard Crashaw's Devotional Verse / 259

PAULA McQUADE
Truth and Consequences: Equivocation, Mental Reservation, and the Secret
Catholic Subject in Early Modern England  / 277

CLINTON ALLEN BRAND
"Times winged Charriot": Marvell's Poetics of Secularization / 291

GABRIEL EGAN
Hearing or Seeing a Play?: Evidence of Early Modern Theatrical
Terminology /327

CONVERSATION
An Interview with Donna Hamilton and Anne Lake Prescott / 349

THEATRICAL PERFORMANCES

PETER HAPP


Re: Henry Irving on KEAN: Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2752  Wednesday, 5 December 2001

From:           Christopher Moore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Dec 2001 11:06:01 -0800
Subject: 12.2739 Re: Henry Irving on KEAN: Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2739 Re: Henry Irving on KEAN: Shakespeare

Dear Judi,

I am smiling as I write this.  I have kept Irving's text the way it
appears in the book, published in 1893  I believe, I don't have it with
me at the moment.  Perhaps, the spellings should have been changed to
suit a modern eye, but there is a charm in your response that I wouldn't
trade for a world of proper spellings.   As for the text, it is word for
word what Irving said in the lecture, or what he published as having
been word for word what he said in the lecture.  Edmund Kean's life
might be expurgated in respectable company, but the text as it is posted
on the site has not been thinned at all.

Chris Moore
www.classicaltheatre.com

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Cold Ghosts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2753  Wednesday, 5 December 2001

From:           Alex Hoffer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Dec 2001 21:26:22 -0500
Subject:        Cold Ghosts

The number and emphatic placements of references to cold weather during
the battlements scenes--"'tis bitter cold, and I am sick at heart
(I.i.8), "the air bites shrewdly, it is very cold" (I.iv.1), and "it is
a nipping and an eager air" (I.iv.2)--in Hamlet has always seemed
curious to me, especially given the good weather of Acts IV and V.
Surely they are more than enough to establish a feeling of dread and a
location shift between I.iii and I.iv.  Does anyone know whether the
notion of "cold spots" indicating a ghost's presence existed when Hamlet
was written?

-Alex

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2751  Wednesday, 5 December 2001

From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Dec 2001 19:41:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors

Readers of SHAKSPER in the Philadelphia area might be able to take
advantage of the Thursday, 6 December screening of a Ukrainian film
advertised as *Romeo and Juliet*-related. (I must add, however, that it
sure doesn't sound like my grandparents' Carpathian Mountains any more!)

 FILM @ INTERNATIONAL HOUSE -
 Thursday, December 6 at 8:00pm.
 Admission is $5.00 at the door, available one hour before showtime.

 SHADOWS OF FORGOTTEN ANCESTORS, directed by Sergei Paradjanov
 (1964, Ukraine, 100 mins, Color, Ukrainian w/ English subtitles)

A masterpiece of Ukrainian folklore and winner of sixteen awards from
around the globe, Shadows Of Forgotten Ancestors is an extravagant,
surreal, sumptuous saga of Romeo and Juliet in the Carpathian Mountains.
Set in the 19th century Ukraine, the drama centers around a young man
who is trapped in a loveless marriage and haunted by his dead, but true
sweetheart. Chants, folk songs and vibrant color combine with
meticulously choreographed camera and actor movement making this film
the most haunting, religious-superstitious and sensual-erotic film to
ever come out of the former Soviet Union.

Sergei Paradjanov, though not as widely known in the West, is one of the
true mavericks and visionaries of the modern cinema. He managed to
direct some of the most lyrical and beautiful films ever made while
suffering under a government which censored and banned much of his work
and eventually sent him to prison. Of his art Paradjanov offers: "Only
in ballet do we see pure beauty, pure pantomime. This is what I am
aspiring to. The basis of my art is Persian miniatures, enamels from
Byzantium -very na


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