2001

The Elizabethan Theatre VI

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2610  Thursday, 15 November 2001

From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 Nov 2001 00:03:36 -0600
Subject:        The Elizabethan Theatre VI

Does anybody out there happen to have the following volume?

*The Elizabethan Theatre VI*, edited by G. R. Hibbard.  Papers given at
the Sixth International Conference on Elizabethan Theatre held at the
University of Waterloo, Ontario, July 1975.  Toronto: Macmillan,
published in collaboration with the University of Waterloo (1978).

Specifically, I'm looking for an article in this volume by M. C.
Bradbrook called "Shakespeare and the Multiple Theatres of Jacobean
London", pp. 88-104.  If anybody out there has the volume, and would be
willing to look something up for me in the abovementioned article, I
would be very grateful.

Thanks,
Dave Kathman
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Re: Does Goneril Commit Suicide?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2609  Thursday, 15 November 2001

From:           David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Nov 2001 16:41:59 -0500
Subject: 12.2599 Re: Does Goneril Commit Suicide?
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2599 Re: Does Goneril Commit Suicide?

The tired, drunken, illiterate spectator standing at the back, unable to
see or hear what's going on, would indeed, as Bill Godshalk says, have
an excuse for believing, mistakenly, that Regan killed Goneril. A
critic, however, presumably does not have such an excuse.

The scenario of the impercipient spectator calls attention to something
I should perhaps have made clearer, about the distinction between
reading and viewing. M. Yawney probably meant something similar. When we
talk about the experience of reading and viewing, and how we experience
each, we may use the critical "we". It could also be called the
"argumentative 'we'" or the "ideal 'we'". We, the critics, are talking
about what we, the readers or spectators experience as an ideally
attentive and attuned audience. We are trying to approach that ideal,
though of course like all ideals it is not absolutely attainable.

Yawney's point, I think, was that a play, written to be performed, would
not rely, as much as a novel might, on extremely delicate and subtle
hints which could not practically be apprehended in the onrush of
action, even by that attentive and attuned audience. The fact that in
practice some members of the audience, or some critics--or even we
ourselves--sometimes don't get it does not, we hope, permanently
discourage us from pursuing the ideal through reasoned argument and
discussion; it's what spurs us on.

Best wishes,
David Bishop

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: MND Tops Survey

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2607  Thursday, 15 November 2001

From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Nov 2001 20:18:55 +0000
Subject: MND Tops Survey
Comment:        SHK 12.2600 MND Tops Survey

I have to say that I am amazed that 'R and J' is nowhere in that list of
high school top ten dramas.

Is it because it is so tragic for the young that schools will not do it
or what? Is it lack of confidence in the play? Their own acting? It
simply seems so perfect for a 14-18 yr old age range!

And Charlie Brown??????? Level with The Crucible?

I don't know 'Rumors'. Some advice?

Stuart Manger

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Re: Richard II

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2608  Thursday, 15 November 2001

[1]     From:   Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Nov 2001 13:12:38 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2602 Re: Richard II 4.1.236-41

[2]     From:   Dan Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 15 Nov 2001 13:27:56 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2602 Re: Richard II 4.1.236-41


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Nov 2001 13:12:38 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 12.2602 Re: Richard II 4.1.236-41
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2602 Re: Richard II 4.1.236-41

> Why is this so? One explanation is that Bolinbroke,
> unlike Richard, draws
> strength and resolve from the land of England.
> Whereas Richard thinks
> that HE grants favors to England's land (3.2.8-11),
> Bolingbroke feels
> that only England's land can sustain him:
>
>         Then England's ground, farewell. Sweet soil,
> adieu.
>         My mother and my nurse, that bears me yet!
>
> (1.3.306-307)
>
> Richard has no where to "ground" himself, so to
> speak, and thus can only
> be a player king that falls apart whenever adversity
> strikes.
> Bolingbroke, on the other hand, can withstand
> adversity because he is
> rooted in England's very soil.

It's interesting to view this earth concept from many perspectives, and
not only because Shakespeare features very cryptic and metaphorical
gardeners in the play. In III.ii., the scene I would argue that we begin
to feel rumblings of sympathy for Richard even as he pities himself,
upon his return from Ireland, Richard says the following:

Dear earth, I do salute thee with my hand,
Though rebels wound thee with their horses' hoofs.
As a long-parted mother with her child
Plays fondly with her tears, and smiles in meeting,
So, weeping, smiling, greet I thee my earth,
And do thee favours with my royal hands.
Feed not thy sovereign's foe, my gentle earth.
Nor with thy sweets comfort his ravenous sense...

and so on. Richard appropriates his land for his own defense and even
makes himself into a sort of gardener and caretaker of that land,
smiling on it like the sun and weeping onto it like the clouds. As Ed
Taft pointed out, he bequeaths favors. But he also realizes in the same
scene that he cannot command the earth into obeying his divine right.
Later in the same scene, his mood and outlook changes drastically:

Let's talk of graves, of worms and epitaphs,
Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes
Write sorrow in the bosom of the earth.
Let's choose executors and talk of wills -
And yet not so, for what can we bequeath
Save our deposed bodies to the ground?
Our lands, our lives, and all are Bolingbroke's;
And nothing can we call our own but death,
And that small model of the barren earth
Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.
For God's sake, let us sit upon the ground,
And tell sad stories of the death of kings...

The land is a character in this play, and as John of Gaunt pronounced
"this earth, this realm, this England" to be so many things, he also
predicted its corruption by the future civil wars. As the play moves on,
Richard becomes rooted in that soil, but only buried in it. His blood
pollutes the purity of that land for almost 100 years.

God, I love this play. Why isn't it performed more often?

Brian Willis

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dan Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 Nov 2001 13:27:56 -0000
Subject: 12.2602 Re: Richard II 4.1.236-41
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2602 Re: Richard II 4.1.236-41

The difference between someone playing a role and someone who fills it
is intriguing.  It made me wonder if it followed from Shakespeare musing
about the difference between actors who give an empty show of playing a
role and those who are convincing.  Further, It made me think about
other characters that might have the same failing.

Malvolio is ridiculed and held in contempt because he is seen to
"Practice behaviour to his own shadow"  (Maria Act II Sc.iv).  His
actions are not moved by anything substantial (he is a shadow of a
proper man) and this learning behaviour to impress others is a symptom
of his self-love.  Perhaps Richard also suffers from Malvolio's other
weakness, his self-love causes him to reason that he is "...so crammed,
as he thinks, with excellences, that it is his ground of faith that all
that look on him love him; and on that vice in him will my revenge find
notable cause to work."  (Maria Act II Sc.iii).

Edmund Taft's reference to Oklahoma reminds me of the film Excalibur
where it is a central idea that "The land and the king are one", and the
health of the one depends on the other.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2606  Thursday, 15 November 2001

From:           Ronald Corthell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Nov 2001 14:09:40 -0500
Subject:        Call for Papers

Abstracts and inquiries are invited for an interdisciplinary conference
on "Early Modern English Catholic Culture," to be held at the Newberry
Library's Center for Renaissance Studies, Chicago, Illinois, October
11-12, 2002.  The conference, sponsored by Newberry Renaissance
Consortium members Wayne State, Miami, and Kent State Universities, is
being organized by Arthur Marotti, Frances E. Dolan, Christopher
Highley, and Ronald Corthell.

The conference is envisioned as a conversation among scholars from a
variety of disciplines.  Organizers welcome proposals for papers or
panels on any aspect of Catholic culture in early modern England.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to, church history and
politics, martyrology, nationhood, gender, class, popular culture,
ritual, missionaries, polemical writing, devotional art and literature,
doctrinal controversies, anti-Catholic representation, scholarly sources
and methodologies.

Inquiries and one-page abstracts should be sent to Ronald Corthell,
Department of English, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 or
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Abstracts must be received by March 1, 2002 in order
to be considered for inclusion in the conference.

Ronald Corthell
Kent State University

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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