2001

Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2530  Friday, 2 November 2001

[1]     From:   Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 01 Nov 2001 15:39:28 +0000
        Subj:   Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN

[2]     From:   Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Nov 2001 17:32:15 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2525 Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN

[3]     From:   Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 01 Nov 2001 19:59:04 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2525 Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 01 Nov 2001 15:39:28 +0000
Subject:        Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN

While acknowledging that there was nothing original in my comments on
the title(s) of Twelfth Night, I'm a little sad that they led only to
the dispute of the last few days. I was hoping that there might be some
new feedback on the proposition that while Malvolio is discountenanced,
his betters are indulging in equally unsafe aspirations. At the end of
this play, does any character have an untroubled future in prospect?
Does the spirit of comedy demand that we ignore the likely instability
of the planned marriages?

Hopefully,
Brian Haylett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Nov 2001 17:32:15 -0000
Subject: 12.2525 Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2525 Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN

> Graham Hall attributes the following to me:
>
> > It seems to me very unlikely that the printers of the Folio
> > would have printed any of Shakespeare's plays without
> > having conversations with those who were directly involved
> > in their production (Hemings and Condell, for example)
> > or at least with others who had had such conversations
>
> Thomas Larque wrote this and I quoted it to disagree with him. Such
> conversations (if they happened) didn't prevent manifest naming errors
> in F1.

I would have thought that such conversations would be far more likely to
run along the lines of "Here is the script for Twelfth Night" or "We are
just printing Twelfth Night now" than to include "This is the play with
Innogen in it" or references to other parts of internal text..  Titles
are the single most likely thing to have been discussed with people who
knew the plays, and knew how the titles should be pronounced.

Thomas Larque.
"Shakespeare and His Critics"
http://shakespearean.org.uk

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 01 Nov 2001 19:59:04 +0000
Subject: 12.2525 Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2525 Re: Sir Toby, Sebastian, et TN

>[...]Graham Hall attributes the following to me:
>
> > It seems to me very unlikely that the printers of the Folio
> > would have printed any of Shakespeare's plays without
> > having conversations with those who were directly involved
> > in their production (Hemings and Condell, for example)
> > or at least with others who had had such conversations
>
>Thomas Larque wrote this and I quoted it to disagree with him. Such
>conversations (if they happened) didn't prevent manifest naming errors
>in F1.
>
>Gabriel Egan [...]

Mea culpa  - an error in part due to formatting changes (compositor E, I
suspect) which I acknowledged personally on 30 Oct.

The intriguing question remains therefore as to what can be trusted
about F.  "Conversations" or no, some of the claims in "To the Great
Variety of Readers" begin to look compromised (except, perhaps "as he
conceived them" ) if basic errors can be demonstrated. If this is so,
then many other "verities" must be considered set down so in heaven but
not in earth.  Nothing new in that, thank Jove! It keeps many of us
distracted as we travel towards the grave...and look what it does for
academic employment levels.

Best wishes, Graham Hall

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Searching for Play: Please Help

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2529  Thursday, 1 November 2001

From:           Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Nov 2001 08:49:52 -0500
Subject:        Searching for Play: Please Help

Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> forwards a question to the list
from a non-member. If you care to reply, please to so directly to the
original questioner, Mary M. Zimmerman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

Hello, I have been desperately searching for an out-of-print play and
have come up empty so far.  Perhaps you can help me.

The play is called "A Dress Rehearsal of Hamlet". My grandmother
performed in this play as a teenager in Philadelphia, PA in the 1920s.
Unfortunately that is all I know about it. Except that it takes the
"play-within-a-play" theme of Hamlet to a new level (it's a play about a
dress rehearsal of the play within a play!) It was probably written
before 1928.

I definitely want to purchase this play no matter what the price. If
there is any way you could help me I would greatly appreciate it. Any
input you may have about where else I should look would also be
wonderful. Thank you very much. My contact information is below. I
appreciate your attention to this request.

Yours truly,
Mary M. Zimmerman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Beerbohm Tree's The Tempest

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2527  Thursday, 1 November 2001

From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Nov 2001 08:56:49 GMT0BST
Subject:        Beerbohm Tree's The Tempest

People might be interested in the following site, containing an edition
of the performing text for Beerbohm Tree's important production of The
Tempest in 1904.   It's a pretty basic site - my first attempt at such a
thing - but might have its uses in making this comparatively rare text
available.

http://www.leeds.ac.uk/english/staff/projects/treestempest/

Professor David Lindley
Head, School of English

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Schoolmaids?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2528  Thursday, 1 November 2001

From:           Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 01 Nov 2001 10:48:26 -0800
Subject:        Schoolmaids?

In A Midsummer Night's Dream, Helena and Hermia make references to
having been at school together. Helena, for example, takes the sudden
affection of Lysander and Demetrius as a cruel joke and wonders why
Hermia has forgotten their "schooldays' friendship" (3.2.203). Later she
recalls that Hermia "was a vixen when she went to school" (3.2.325). In
Measure for Measure, Isabella refers to romantic "schoolmaids" who
imagine themselves with other names (presumably the names of potential
husbands).

I found these lines a bit surprising since I had assumed that while
aristocratic young women would have received tutoring (as Baptista
arranges for his daughters in Shrew), they would not have gone to school
the way boys would have. A quick check of a few sources suggests I am
not alone in this assumption. Does anyone know what sort of school
Shakespeare might have imagined Helena and Hermia attending?

t.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Shakespeare Online

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2526  Thursday, 1 November 2001

From:           Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 01 Nov 2001 09:29:50 +0100
Subject: 12.2516 Shakespeare Online
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2516 Shakespeare Online

> These are the only modern, edited editions that I'm aware of for free,
> online. Any I've missed?

You may find some more through:
http://www.unibas.ch/shine/linkssourcesshworks.htm

Markus Marti
http://www.unibas.ch/shine/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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