2001

Re: Richard II

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2670  Tuesday, 27 November 2001

From:           Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Nov 2001 06:16:17 -0600
Subject: 12.2657 Re: Richard II
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2657 Re: Richard II

I won't respond directly to Stephen Dobbin's explosion of rage against
Terence Hawkes, except to suggest that perhaps it's unwise to be too
vituperative when blaming another for vituperation.

In defense of TH, however -- and I hear the ghost of Brother Dave
saying, "Now ain't that weird" -- I also have problems with audiences
being too close to the actor, whether as an audience-member or an actor.
I grant this may simply be a personality problem on the one hand, and a
limitation of skill on the other, but it is true. When I'm on-stage I
think as little as possible about the audience (not at all is best) and
have to remind myself when doing comedies to wait for laughs to subside.
"Intimate" theatres, where you're in danger of tripping over the
audience's feet, drive me nuts because they make it that much more
difficult to do.

Of course, this can be overcome. I have been part of some very
successful shows in small theatres, and have seen any number of
excellent performances in such venues (especially at The Octagon
(Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Montgomery)), but I find it distracting
from either side. And the  fewer distractions the better as far as I'm
concerned.

On another issue, a correspondent (Larry Weiss) suggested a few days ago
with reference of R&J that "the feud has pretty much petered out by the
time the play starts.  The only character who takes it seriously is
Tybalt.  For the servants it is an occasion for fun and exercise, for
everyone else it is in the background with no immediate impact." While I
agree that the play is (as traditionally held) about young love, I
disagree that the feud is unimportant. All the productions I have seen
(and the one I have performed in) made a great deal of the feud,
especially the opening brawl.  The murderous hatred of Montague and
Capulet is necessary to make the play make sense.

Cheers,
don

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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TOC Review of English Studies 52 (Nov. 2001)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2669  Monday, 26 November 2001

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Nov 2001 07:52:07 -0600
Subject:        TOC Review of English Studies 52 (Nov. 2001)

Review of English Studies, Volume 52, Issue 208 dated November 2001

ARTICLES:

`Comfortable Doctrine': Twelfth Night and the Trinity
Paul Dean
500-515

Ravished and Revised: The 1616 Lucrece
Katherine Duncan-Jones
516-523

REVIEWS:

Print, Manuscript, Performance: The Changing Relations of the Media in
Early Modern England -- Arthur F. Marotti, Michael D. Bristol
H. R. Woudhuysen
562-564

Galatea; Midas. John Lyly
Leah Scragg
564-566

A Companion to Shakespeare -- David Scott Kastan
Brian Vickers
566-570

Shakespeare and Narrative: Shakespeare Survey 53 -- Peter Holland
Emma Smith
570-571

Shakespeare's Ovid: The Metamorphoses in the Plays and Poems -- A. B.
Taylor
Peter Happe
571-573

Showing Like a Queen: Female Authority and Literary Experiment in
Spenser,
Shakespeare and Milton -- Katherine Eggert
Emma Smith
573-575

Charismatic Authority in Early Modern English Tragedy -- Raphael Falco
Adrian Poole
575-576

The `Shepheards Nation': Jacobean Spenserians and Early Stuart Political
Culture, 1612-1625 -- Michelle O'callaghan
Mishtooni Bose
576-578

Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth -- John Dolan
Howard Erskine-Hill
578-579

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Sight and Sound Jan. 1997

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2667  Monday, 26 November 2001

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 25 Nov 2001 11:15:43 -0800
Subject:        Sight and Sound Jan. 1997

Does anybody have a copy of the January 1997 issue of Sight and Sound?
I want to get read the review of Adrian Noble's film version of *MND,*
and would very much appreciate getting a photocopy.  Please contact me
off list at the address above if you can help.

Thanks,
Mike Jensen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

TOC Essays in Criticism 51 (Oct 2001)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2668  Monday, 26 November 2001

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Nov 2001 07:42:03 -0600
Subject:        TOC Essays in Criticism 51 (Oct 2001)

Essays in Criticism, Volume 51, Issue 4 dated October 2001

David Ellis, "Black Comedy in Shakespeare": 385-403.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Globe Research Seminar in Early Modern Drama

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2666  Monday, 26 November 2001

From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Nov 2001 16:49:33 -0000
Subject:        Globe Research Seminar in Early Modern Drama

GLOBE RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN DRAMA ON 2 DECEMBER

Globe Education, in coordination with the English Department of King's
College London, the Drama Department of University of Bristol and the
Shakespeare Institute of the University of Birmingham, has initiated a
new research seminar in early modern drama for postgraduate students and
people who have recently gained their PhDs. The seminar is a forum for
up-and-coming scholars working in English and Drama to talk about their
work with those who are at a similar stage in their careers, and all
postgraduate students are welcome.

The next seminar takes place at Shakespeare's Globe London From 12 noon
to 2 pm on Sunday 2 December, and there will be two speakers:

Farah Karim (Royal Holloway) "Cosmetics in early modern drama"

Heloise Senechal (Shakespeare Institute) "Stephen Gosson and acting"

After the speakers there will be questions and wine.

At 3pm there will be a "Read Not Dead" performance of Thomas Drue's _The
Duchess of Suffolk_ in the Globe Education Centre.  "Read Not Dead" is a
Globe Education project to stage-read all of the 400 or so
non-Shakespearian plays written between 1567 and 1642 with professional
casts, and so far about 10 percent of this body of work has been
performed and digitally recorded by Globe Education.

The seminar is free of charge, but tickets for the staged readings will
cost 


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