2001

CFP: THEATRE(S) IN THE AGE OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2517  Wednesday, 31 October 2001

From:           Savas Patsalidis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Oct 2001 07:52:44 +0200 (EET)
Subject:        CFP: THEATRE(S) IN THE AGE OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES

                              CALL FOR PAPERS

                 THEATRE(S) IN THE AGE OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES

                                   Gramma
                      Journal of Theory and Criticism
                           Issue Number 10 (2002)
                            Aristotle University

  At the turn of the twentieth century we can feel privileged as humans
to
  have at our service a series of scientific discoveries and
technological
    inventions that have unlocked for us the deepest secrets of life and
  creation and which give us prospects of seemingly limitless control
over
                   communication and genetic engineering.
 This new sense of power and control over the future of life and
humanity is
certainly not a pure triumph but a mixed blessing. And art has been
quick to
     confront this ambiguity. Benevolent representations of science and
  technology mingle with darker representations of doom, catastrophe,
decay
 and desperation in various forms of art, in particular theatre.
Dramatists
 have observed, either sardonically or with humour, the material and
ethical
 changes brought to our lives through recent advances in applied science
and
     technology, but they have also envisaged nightmares, atrocities and
 dystopias, many of which have already been experienced in real life. At
the
     same time the stage has welcomed the facilities offered by the new
   technologies and is exploring new notions and forms of
representation,
                       subjectivity, mediation, etc.
  The aim of Gramma's special issue is to raise provocative questions
about
 the complex variety of forms technologies have taken in the theatre(s)
and
drama(s) of the new century. To this end the volume invites papers on
issues
                                  such as:
    - Dramatic representations of science/technology in present-day life
  - Ethical issues arising from the uninhibited use of
science/technology

           - Science dystopias; the Frankenstein and other myths
   - The theatrical body as cyborg - The body in the space of technology
             - Technology in culture and gender representation
 - Technological requirements in contemporary staging (Digital
Scenography,
       Televisual mise-en-sc


1914 Oxford & 1911 Globe Shakespeare Online

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2516  Wednesday, 31 October 2001

From:           Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Oct 2001 14:40:21 -0800
Subject:        1914 Oxford & 1911 Globe Shakespeare Online

Jim Slager:

>No.  The teacher can go here: http://tech-two.mit.edu/Shakespeare/ For
>the texts of the complete works and copy and paste like I've done here:

If anyone is still using those horrible "Moby" texts, you'll be pleased
to know you can stop now. There are two decent modern-spelling, edited
editions available for free in electronic form

Bartelby.com has the 1914 Oxford text (Ed. W. J. Craig) up for free.
(It's especially well-HTMLed, including line-number tags for
hyperlinking to.)

http://www.bartelby.com/70

There's also the 1911 Globe edition on Perseus. Based on the 1895 (?)
text edited by William George Clark and William Aldis Wright.
Hyperlinked to a couple of Shakespeare glossaries.

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/perscoll?collection=Perseus%3Acollection%3ARenaissance&type=Any&lang=Any&lookup=shakespeare

(There are also a couple of plays from the Furness editions here, plus a
folio transcript.)

These aren't as good as the more modern editions, but they're pretty
respectable. Bartelby's web interface is much easier to use and much
faster.

Don Bloom:
>There are several
>non-copyright versions available

These are the only modern, edited editions that I'm aware of for free,
online. Any I've missed?

Thanks,
Steve
http://princehamlet.com

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Shakespeare Translates Monty Python

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2514  Wednesday, 31 October 2001

From:           Richard Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Oct 2001 21:42:11 +0000
Subject:        Shakespeare Translates Monty Python

Shakespeare Translates "MONTY PYTHON & THE HOLY GRAIL"

One of the extras in the new Special Edition DVD of "Monty Python and
the Holy Grail" is described as follows on the package:    "NEW!
Subtitles for People Who Don't Like The Film (taken from Shakespeare's
Henry IV, Part II)"

When I first heard of this, I assumed they would just print the test of
Shakespeare's play as a series of subtitles running along with the film,
but having nothing to do with the film.  I was wrong.  They've searched
through Shakespeare's play, and taken the lines that most closely
correspond to the film's dialogue.  For example, when King Arthur cries,
"Run Away!" the subtitle is "Fly the field!"    I found it quite
amusing.

Note, the Shakespeare subtitles are available only on the new Special
Edition DVD that has just recently been released.

_______________________________________________________________
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Re: Branagh Query

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2515  Wednesday, 31 October 2001

[1]     From:   Emma French <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Oct 2001 16:49:01
        Subj:   Re: Branagh Query

[2]     From:   Mark Lawhorn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Oct 2001 16:03:38 -1000 (HST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2491 Re: Branagh Query

[3]     From:   Laura Jean Carroll <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Oct 2001 14:54:24 +1100
        Subj:   Re: Branagh Query


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Emma French <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Oct 2001 16:49:01
Subject:        Re: Branagh Query

I really appreciate everyone's help on and offlist on the Branagh query,
although I am even more confused now. I am aware of Renaissance Films
and I know that they distributed Branagh's Henry V and Much Ado About
Nothing. I also know plenty about Branagh's Renaissance Theatre Company.

However, I had assumed that they are both distinct entities, and both
different to the Shakespeare Film Company, which was specifically
founded by Branagh to produce Shakespeare films in the late 1990s, and
Love's Labour's Lost was the company's first project. That is the
company I need to track down, unless I have imagined it.

Best,
Emma French

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Lawhorn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Oct 2001 16:03:38 -1000 (HST)
Subject: 12.2491 Re: Branagh Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2491 Re: Branagh Query

The address I used to contact Branagh a couple of years ago is

Kenneth Branagh LTD
Shepperton Studios
Studios Road
Shepperton, Middlesex
TW17 OQD
United Kingdom

I don't know whether this address is still valid, but perhaps it's worth
a try.

Mark H. Lawhorn   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
                        or
                  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Jean Carroll <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Oct 2001 14:54:24 +1100
Subject:        Re: Branagh Query

Hi.

Kenneth Branagh is no longer connected with Renaissance Films, and
hasn't been for many years.  LLL was the first venture of a new group
called the Shakespeare Film Company.  Also in development were a Wall
Street MACBETH and a Kyoto cherry-blossom AYLI.  Since LLL flopped these
projects appear to have been shelved.  The Shakespeare Film Company was
mostly backed by a British film financing group called Intermedia:  I
think hunting them down would be the simplest way to find out the
current status of Branagh's Shakespeare film work.  There's a website
called (I think) theknowledgeonline.com which lists contact details for
media comapnies, personnel, and products; it's searchable by people's
names and by the credits of specific productions.  Though star personnel
like Branagh are never listed, quite often their associates are.

Cheers,
Laura Carroll

_______________________________________________________________
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The Tempest at the University of Cincinnati

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2513  Wednesday, 31 October 2001

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Oct 2001 16:23:37 -0500
Subject:        The Tempest at the University of Cincinnati

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music presented its
production of Shakespeare's The Tempest from October 24 through October
28, 2001. I saw it on the evening of August 27. In many ways, it is a
very thought-provoking and puzzling production.

Michael Burnham was the director, Jonathan Kamholtz the dramaturg, and
K. Jenny Jones the action director.  Cameron Anderson's set design was
excellent: two very large (perhaps 30 feet tall) wooden structures,
resembling waves, that were suitable as acting space and for entrances
from the rear of the stage.  Prospero's cell and vantage point was a
platform about 20 feet off the stage and to the right.  There were
ladders up the wave-structures and to Prospero's cell.  The sound
design, very important in this play, was by Rachel Maki. The lavish
Renaissance costumes were designed by Tracey Dunne.

In this production, Prospero (Lindsey Marlin) is "the Right Duchess of
Milan," Miranda's mother. In the final scene, she is stripped onstage to
her chemise by her spirits, and is dressed to resemble Queen Elizabeth
I. The play becomes then, not Shakespeare's goodbye to the London stage,
but Elizabeth's farewell to the great stage of life.

Antonia (not Antonio) is the "Usurping Duchess of Milan" (Torie Lashae
Wiggins) and, of course, Prospero's sister. Antonia is black, Prospero
white, and I am not sure if the casting is blind, or if there is some
implied significance in the color contrast.

Perhaps most surprising is the appearance of Sycorax as a ghost (Maureen
Doherty --with a Ceres-like headdress) who hovers at the edges of the
action.  Her lines, for which Jon Kamholtz is responsible, seem to have
been taken from other characters in the script.  At times, Sycorax
echoes and mirrors Prospero.

At others, she is Caliban's advocate, and a creature linked to the
natural world, even as Prospero is linked to the world of human arts and
artifice.  Sycorax is another voice -- one not articulated by
Shakespeare in his version of the script. In this production, there are
more mothers than there are fathers.

Ariel -- "The Amazing Two-Bodied ARIEL" -- is played by Katie Stuckey
and Samuel Stricklen.  Both actors are on stage at the same time, and
they split the Ariel's lines and actions.  I suppose that Ariel in this
way comes across as completely androgynous, and since Stuckey is white
and Stricklen black, there may also be the suggestion that Ariel
transcends ethnic as well as sexual/gender boundaries.

This production takes the phrase "Ariel and all his quality" (1.2.193)
seriously, and adds nine "Noumenous Shades of Fae" to the script.  Some
of these spirits seem visible to the onstage characters, others do not.
In any case, they are a constant presence as stagehands and pieces of
furniture.

Scenes 1 and 2 of the script are conflated.  While Prospero gives
Miranda (and the audience) some necessary exposition, Rachel Maki's
storm all but drowns the young actors' words.  The conflation makes
dramatic sense; Prospero's expository speech is long -- one might say
tedious, but the storm should be kept at a sound level that allows the
audience to hear the actors. I wonder why the director, Michael Burham,
made the decision to keep the noise level high.

The fourth act masque is played not by spirits, but by the charmed
Alonso (Thomas Christian Korbee, Jr.), Sebastian (Eric Solomon), and
Antonia.  And it is played for laughs -- and orchestrated by the
ever-present spirits. These decisions, however, seem to change and
complicate the import of Prospero's assertion": "These our actors, / As
I foretold you, were all spirits, and / Are melted into air, thin air"
(4.1.148-50). In terms of this production, the actors are not spirits,
and when Prospero delivers this speech she seems torn by emotion.  I
thought the emotion was anger modulating into tears of sadness.  Other
auditors felt that Prospero was sad throughout the speech.

The play ends with Gonzalo (Brandon D. Jones) left on the island.  After
all, he did want to be king of it.  Perhaps Caliban (Michael Frieman)
will keep him company, and they can quarrel over who's the true king of
the island.  In any case, it is a puzzling conclusion, and one auditor
told me that she wondered why a true and faithful retainer is being
punished at play's end. Why isn't Gonzalo part of the general exodus
from the island?

Bill Godshalk

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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