Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: October ::
Re: Age of Consent
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2278  Wednesday, 3 October 2001

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 02 Oct 2001 14:49:12 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2272 Re: Age of Consent

[2]     From:   Don Bloom <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 03 Oct 2001 09:26:49 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2272 Re: Age of Consent


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 02 Oct 2001 14:49:12 -0400
Subject: 12.2272 Re: Age of Consent
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2272 Re: Age of Consent

> Since puberty apparently occurred later in the Renaissance than in
> modern times this age of consent seems to have no reference to the
> physical development of a girl's body into an adult woman

Nor should it.  The question of consent is one of understanding, not
readiness.  Why else would we now set the age of consent at three or
four years after puberty?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 03 Oct 2001 09:26:49 -0500
Subject: 12.2272 Re: Age of Consent
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2272 Re: Age of Consent

Bruce Young writes:

> the average age of marriage was about 25 for women, 27 for men

While I recognize that the matter is a vexed one, this assertion goes
against all that I've read on the matter.

Does this statistic mix in second and subsequent marriages as well as
first ones? What kind of average is it, and how was it derived? Is this
now universally held to be the case by Renaissance historians?

My impression was that (royalty aside), people in the Middle Ages and
Renaissance generally married as soon as their families were financially
able to manage it. Thus younger sons had to wait, but the eldest usually
married in his late teens. And daughters got married off as soon as
there was a sufficiently appropriate and / or lucrative offer -- whether
at 13 or 30.

Is this untrue?

We need more data here.

Regards,
don

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.