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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: October ::
Re: LLW
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2443  Thursday, 25 October 2001

[1]     From:   Bob Grumman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Oct 2001 16:29:25 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2435 Re: LLW

[2]     From:   Gary Allen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 25 Oct 2001 02:35:58 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2407 Re: LLW


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Grumman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Oct 2001 16:29:25 -0400
Subject: 12.2435 Re: LLW
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2435 Re: LLW

> The operative word is EXTANT. Anyone who has spent any time storing
> manuscripts for an author or archiving for a theater knows that things
> do disappear.  --M. Yawney

Sure.  I'm an author, and some of my own manuscripts have disappeared
over the years.  Still, my points remain true.

> I guess I misspoke before--I am baffled that people think that all the
> plays of Shakespeare (especially the early ones and the less popular
> ones) were still extant and locatable at the time the folio was
> assembled some years after Shakespeare's death.  --M. Yawney

In view of the many early plays and plays probably not popular that WERE
in the First Folio makes it hard for me to understand why it should
baffle you that some of us can believe that maybe, over a period of
seven years, Shakespeare's highly motivated fellow actors may have
managed to find all his non-collaborative plays (as they said they did).

> Meres is a fairly good authority and if he said there was a LLW, I
> expect that there probably was, but it is probably a lost play sharing
> the fate of Cardenio and many other tantalizing but irretrievable
> works of the period.   --M. Yawney

Or it is a play known to us under a different name.

> >(1) it DOES contain all the extant plays that scholars agree were his
> >alone;<
>
> There's been much dispute about additional hands, Robert Greene's for
> instance, in *Titus Andronicus* and certain sections of *Henry VI*,
> among other titles.  While most scholars are now resolved that these
> plays were by Shakespeare alone, they are still far from agreement
> regarding *Henry VIII*.
>
> --Christopher Paul

True.  That's why I didn't say the First Folio contained all the extant
plays known to have been by Shakespeare alone, and no others.

                                                     --Bob G.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gary Allen <
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Date:           Thursday, 25 Oct 2001 02:35:58 EDT
Subject: 12.2407 Re: LLW
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2407 Re: LLW

Mike Jenson writes:

>Several days ago, someone suggested that *LLW* was unlikely do be a
>sequel in part because sequel's were so unusual in the early modern era.
>I delayed replying in order to make a complete list, but I still haven't
>done it, and the days are passing, so off the top of my head:

A great number of the plays for the Admiral's Men which Henslowe noted
in his accounts fall in this category.  Among other sequels (or at least
sequel-sounding titles) from the 1590s are:

Tamer Cam 1 and 2
The Four Prentices of London 1 (whose second part may have been
Jerusalem)
The First Part of the Tragical Reign of Selimus, Sometime Emperor of the
Turks (although no second part is known)
The Seven Deadly Sins 1 and 2
A Knack to Know a Knave and A Knack to Know an Honest Man
Edward IV 1 and 2
The Love of an English Lady and The Love of a Grecian Lady
The Wise Man of Westchester and The Wise Woman of Hogsdon
Evoradanus, Prince of Denmark 1 & 2
The London Merchant and The Bristow Merchant
Caesar and Pompey 1 and 2
Hercules 1 and 2
The Seven Days of the Week 1 and 2
The Two Angry Women of Abingdon and The Two Merry Women of Abingdon (if
this is not Angry Women 2)
Earl Goodwin and His Three Sons 1 and 2
Black Bateman of the North 1 and 2
Every Man in His Humour and Every Man out of His Humour
The Civil Wars of France 1, 2 and 3
The Set at Maw and The Set at Tennis
and (from around 1604) When You See Me, You Know Me and If You Know Not
Me, You Know Nobody

So even if LLW was not a sequel, it was a follow-on title that would
catch the theatergoer's eye and ear.

Gary

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