2001

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2184  Monday, 17 September 2001

[1]     From:   Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 14 Sep 2001 09:13:22 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2177 Re: Tyndale Bible and "fat" Hamlet

[2]     From:   John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 16:44:30 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2166 Tyndale Bible and "fat" Hamlet

[3]     From:   Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 21:16:05 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2177 Re: Tyndale Bible and "fat" Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Sep 2001 09:13:22 -0700
Subject: 12.2177 Re: Tyndale Bible and "fat" Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2177 Re: Tyndale Bible and "fat" Hamlet

>From:           Steve Sohmer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

> "fat" Hamlet is a players' inside joke ala
>the exchange between Burbage [Hamlet] and Shakespeare [Polonius] about
>killing the calf in the capitol.

I've found this item to be quite curious. I've scoured Chambers,
Baldwin, Bowers, Schoenbaum, etc. etc. and can't find any reference to
Burbage being fat. I've posted this query to this list a couple of
times, asking if there are other refs, but no replies.

This "fat Burgage" tradition seems to be doubly apocryphal, because
there's not even any apocrypha suggesting that Burbage was fat. Baldwin,
among others, draws the conclusion from this line only. He may have been
fat, of course, or there may be a reference I haven't found.

Is that the joke you're suggesting, that it's referring to Burbage's
proportions? I would love to hear a better explanation of the joke,
because I can't make sense of it on available evidence. ("Strong and
scant of breath" doesn't make sense to me either; seems contradictory,
especially in context.)

Thanks,
Steve
http://princehamlet.com

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 16:44:30 -0400
Subject: 12.2166 Tyndale Bible and "fat" Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2166 Tyndale Bible and "fat" Hamlet

> In his booklet The Language of Hamlet (London: U of London, 1995), David
> Daniell, notes that in Judges 3: 29 in the Tyndale Bible, the Moabites
> are described as  

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.