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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: September ::
Re: Times Article
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2188  Monday, 17 September 2001

[1]     From:   Louis Swilley <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Sep 2001 13:04:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <
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        Date:   Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 15:06:18 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Swilley <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Sep 2001 13:04:40 -0500
Subject: 12.2175 Re: Times Article
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article

Mike Jensen wrote,

"I have not seen *A Midsummer Night's Cream,* or any other X-rated
Shakespearian offshoots, but I don't see a difference in kind, only in
use.  Aside from the fact that one is pornographic, and the other was in
family newspapers, as Shakespearean appropriations they seem to have
more commonalities than differences.  If *Terry* is worth knowing about,
then *Cream* must be...  The mere fact that the material is pornographic
does not mean it is by definition less noteworthy than a comic strip,
just more offensive to many.  I don't want to study it, but I'm glad
someone reports that it exists."

[I am, too, Michael, and I agree that Shakespeare porn and Shakespeare
in "Terry and the Pirates" are both somewhat noteworthy.  But my earlier
questions are:

[ a) Should a university responsible for forming the intellectual
regimen of students with such limited time for study as both our
undergraduates and graduates students have to spend on any subject,
allow them to choose either of these subjects, both of which must, under
the pressure of that time-limit, have the very lowest priority as
offerings in any department in which they might appear?  Shouldn't a
university have a philosophy of some kind, a concept of a well-educated
person that directs the creation of its programs and demands standards
for them relative to that concept?  Or is it properly merely an
intellectual shopping mall, an inchoate smorgasbord of courses inviting
titillation and ultimately confusion?

[b) And even if a university decides that such investigations should be
made, should they not, so far as the time-limited student is concerned,
be no more than a squiggle in a course - presumably under the aegis of
one of the departments of the social sciences - that examines the
reflections of literature (or art in general) in the popular culture?

         [ L. Swilley]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 15:06:18 -0400
Subject: 12.2175 Re: Times Article
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article

Followers of this thread, especially those who seem to think that
Shakespeare's writings are asexual, disembodied, and sacred,  may be
interested in reading Robert E. Scholes' The  Rise and Fall of English:
Reconstructing English as a Discipline   (New Haven : Yale University
Press, 1998).  Scholes concludes that the "quasi-religious status once
accorded English literature . . . is hardly viable any longer" [19].

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