Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: September ::
Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2195  Saturday, 22 September 2001

[1]     From:   Mark Harris <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Mon, 17 Sep 2001 07:55:48 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2183 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet

[2]     From:   Peter Donaldson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Sep 2001 11:18:10 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2183 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet

[3]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wed, 19 Sep 2001 10:39:29 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2171 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Harris <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Mon, 17 Sep 2001 07:55:48 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.2183 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2183 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet

I wrote:

> ...the
> print I saw was gorgeous and sharp (it had a 1995
> date on it - I suppose
> a re-release date). Facets Multimedia in Chicago
> showed it twice in
> August, screened by my good friend and master
> projectionist Kirk Madsen,
> who makes every print of every film look as good as
> it possibly can.

I emailed Kirk to ask about the print shown at Facets, and he emailed me
back:

< The print we showed was in fairly good shape, I had no focus problems
with it and I thought it looked pretty darn good.  It was scope - which
can be a little more tricky in the sharpness of the focus, but if good
lenses are used there should not have been a problem.  Of the Russian
films that we showed - 1 print (I think it was "No Path Through The
Fire") had heat damage, and this caused the focus to go in and out,
which may have been the case of the print shown in Canada.  I would like
to know when this guy saw the print he saw, because I don't think there
are many around.  If it was a long time ago it may have been a 16mm
print, and if this was the case, God knows how many problems that could
bring up!! Thanks for the projectionist compliment, Mark, I do try to do
my best and it's nice when someone recognizes it.

Kirk >

Mark R. Harris

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Donaldson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Sep 2001 11:18:10 -0400
Subject: 12.2183 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2183 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet

The Kozinstsev Hamlet is a visually stunning film -- it is also one that
suffers  more than most when seen on a small screen or in a bad print or
video.  It is a CinemaScope (or , more accurately SovSkop) film, with a
very wide (maybe more than 1:2.5?) aspect ratio -- so that, as purists
will say, you're only getting 60% of the image from an unletterboxed
video image.  In addition, Cinemascope and SovSkop are anamorphic
processes with two lenses required for projection -- one to stretch the
image from its horizontally condensed appearance on the emulsion, and
one to focus that image.  There used to be 16mm prints for classroom use
and they were very hard indeed to focus -- and blurry.  The aspect ratio
is more important for this film than for many others because Kozintsev
likes to use the full width not just for landscapes but for group shots
-- eg when Claudius talks to his advisors at one point three or four of
them walk toward the camera (while it tracks back), so that you see four
or five faces in motion spanning the screen.  The grandeur of the ghost
(80ft high?) striding by the castle also suffers diminishment in
miniature -- and this is a Hamlet in which the ghost is a moral and
political center and a bearer of whatever hope (not much) there may be
for the future.

In sum -- this is one case in which the cinema purists are right -- if
you don't see a good print on a big screen, properly projected, you
haven't seen the work.

(I saw it once..... )

Pete Donaldson

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wed, 19 Sep 2001 10:39:29 -0400
Subject: 12.2171 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2171 Re: Grigori Kozintsev's Hamlet

Was no one bothered by the extensive cuts in the last scene?

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.