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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: September ::
Re: Royal Blood
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2198  Saturday, 22 September 2001

[1]     From:   Brian Willis <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Sep 2001 07:42:01 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Sep 2001 15:53:04 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood

[3]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Sep 2001 08:27:43 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Sep 2001 07:42:01 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood

The RSC history cycle this past year was revelatory and exciting. All
eight of the sequenced plays were thought-provoking and just plain
immediate and thrilling. Now that I have seen one of the better
interpretations of the sequence, I find it hard to believe that any
company could do a much better job, especially some Oxfordians claiming
"Woodstock" as part of that cycle.

By the way, the programme for Richard II included a short synopsis of
the events of "Woodstock" without claiming authorship solutions.

B Willis

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Sep 2001 15:53:04 +0100
Subject: 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood

> BBC did Shakespeare's English history plays as a series in the late 60's
> - early 70's. Called it either 'Age of Kings' or 'The Hollow Crown'. May
> have included Marlowe's Edward III.

If it's the same one I'm thinking of, Robert Hardy played Henry V.

They didn't run either EdII or EdIII as part of the series.

There were gods on the earth in those days.

Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Sep 2001 08:27:43 -0700
Subject: 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2182 Re: Royal Blood

Thanks, Dave, for helping me understand why the screw is lose.

John, here are the facts about both *An Age of Kings* and *The Hollow
Crown.*

*Kings* was a 15 part BBC series covering the plays of both
tetralogies.  Part one, the first part of *RII,* was titled *The Hollow
Crown.*  It was produced in 1961.  A young Sean Connery, fresh from his
role as a villain in a Tarzan movie, played Hotspur.  It has quite a
good reputation, and was shown to some acclaim at the Barbican sometime
in the last decade.  One fanaticizes about having it on video tape or
DVD.  The scripts were published my Pyramid Books, New York, in 1961.
It probably had an U.K.  publication, but I have never seen it.

*The Hollow Crown* was a John Barton conceit, produced by the RSC in
1962.  It was a bit of a commentary of monarchy in England, taking its
texts from Shakespeare, Stow, Bliss, Holinshed, Hall, Baker, Churchill
(!), Froissart, Jane Austen (!!), and a couple of anonymous ballads. It
was later broadcast on British television, and much later released on
video.  The script was available from Samuel French, Ltd., London.  In
1971 Barton and book designer Joy  Law did an expanded version, with
many additional readings.  Thomas More, more Shakespeare, and Thackery
were amongst the new readings.  The new book, never staged I believe,
goes up to Victoria and Albert.  It was published by The Dial Press, New
York, in the United States, and also probably had a U.K. publisher, but
again, I have not seen one.

There.  More than you wanted to know.

BTW, since you mentioned it, there are big Steinbeck things planned by
Salinas for the Steinbeck centenary next year.  I'm getting a dog and
naming it Charlie.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

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