Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: September ::
Re: Bartlett
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2228  Thursday, 27 September 2001

[1]     From:   Ray Lischner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 10:04:11 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[2]     From:   Nancy Charlton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 11:13:42 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[3]     From:   David Crosby <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:38:50 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[4]     From:   Gary Allen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:03:17 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[5]     From:   Philip Tomposki <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:11:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ray Lischner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 10:04:11 -0700
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

> Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar
> Quotations* by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A*
> quote, "In peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in
> rest, secure from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is
> not in the 1992 edition.

The 1917 edition does not have that quote. It has only three quotes from
Titus Andronicus.

Ray Lischner, author of Shakespeare for Dummies
(http://www.tempest-sw.com/)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 11:13:42 -0700
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

Mike Jensen asked:

> Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar Quotations*
> by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A* quote, "In
> peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in rest, secure
> from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is not in the 1992
> edition.

A quick look at Bartleby.com, the online Bartlett's, turned up nothing.
Since this is the 1910 edition, and Mike searched the 1992, it may not
be amiss to conclude that John Bartlett did not include the Titus
passage in his "posie of other men's flowers."

The only Early Modern reference that turned up in a search of All
Quotations was Proverbs 3:13-18 -- the passage that personifies Wisdom,
of whom it is said inter alia, that "Her ways are ways of pleasantness,
and all her paths are peace."

Bartleby found this in The Columbia World of Quotations, 1996.

Bartleby's quotation of the day from Colin Powell would be proscribed on
SHAKSPER.

Nancy Charlton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Crosby <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:38:50 -0500
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

The quote in question appears in my 1948 Bartlett on p. 76.

David Crosby

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gary Allen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:03:17 EDT
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

Mike Jensen asks:

>Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar Quotations*
>by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A* quote, "In
>peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in rest, secure
>from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is not in the 1992
>edition.

The Tenth Edition (1919) is online at:

http://www.columbia.edu/acis/bartleby/bartlett/

I don't find your quote among the few cullings from TA.  Wasn't that
still a time when most Shakespeareans thought TA couldn't be by WS and
tended to ignore it?  Possibly, by 1948, its wider reattributing to WS
would have prompted more citations from it in the 1940s editions of
Bartlett.

Gary

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Philip Tomposki <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:11:58 -0400
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

Mike Jensen ssks:

"Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar Quotations*
by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A* quote, "In
peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in rest, secure
from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is not in the 1992
edition."

www.bartleby.com has the 1919 version of Bartlett.  I found three
references from Titus and two footnotes, but not this one.

As for the "dumb friend" quote:

        TO MY DOG "BLANCO."
              ----------
  My dear, dumb friend, low lying there,
   A willing vassal at my feet,
  Glad partner of my home and fare,
   My shadow in the street.

  I look into your great brown eyes,
   Where love and loyal homage shine,
  And wonder where the difference lies
   Between your soul and mine!

  I scan the whole broad earth around
   For that one heart which, dear and true,
  Bears friendship without end or bound,
   And find the prize in you.

  I trust you as I trust the stars,
   Nor cruel loss; nor scoff of pride,
  or beggary, nor dungeon-bars,
   Can move you from my side!

  As patient under injury
   As any Christian saint of old,
  As gentle as a lamb with me,
   But with your brothers bold;

  More playful than a frolic boy,
   More watchful than a sentinel,
  By day and night your constant joy
   To guard and please me well.

  I clasp your head upon my breast-
   The while you whine and lick my hand-
  And thus our friendship is confessed,
   And thus we understand!

  Ah, Blanco! did I worship God,
   As truly as you worship me,
  Or follow where my Master trod
   With your humility,

  Did I sit fondly at his feet,
   As you, dear Blanco, sit at mine,
  And watch Him with a love as sweet,
   My life would grow divine!
                  -J. G. Holland.

Hope this helps.

Philip Tomposki

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.