2001

Re: Put out the light entertainment

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2089  Monday, 2 September 2001

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 31 Aug 2001 19:26:38 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2077 Put out the light entertainment

[2]     From:   John V. Knapp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 31 Aug 2001 22:41:10 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Response to Re: SHK 12.2077 Put out the light entertainment


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Aug 2001 19:26:38 -0700
Subject: 12.2077 Put out the light entertainment.
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2077 Put out the light entertainment.

Graham Hall asked for impressions of "O".  As I'll probably see it
tonight, I've been reading up in the national papers, and the following
links come to mind.  Just about everyone compares it with Shakespeare's
play, in some way or other:

From the National Post:

http://www.nationalpost.com/artslife/arts/movies/story.html?f=/stories/20010831/676897.html

http://www.nationalpost.com/artslife/arts/movies/story.html?f=/stories/20010831/676929.html

From the Globe and Mail:

http://www.globeandmail.ca/thearts (follow a link under "Film" at the
bottom of the page.  And give them a couple of hours--they seem to have
mixed up their links)

From myBC.com, a local site with (in this case, extremely positive)
movie reviews: http://www2.mybc.com/movies/movies/23621.html

Cheers,
Se


HB0 Band of Brothers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2088  Monday, 2 September 2001

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Aug 2001 22:23:12 -0400
Subject:        HB0 Band of Brothers

Perhaps the 10 part mini-series will draw on Henry V for more than the
title. Has anyone read the book?

http://www.hbo.com/band/episode6_landing/index_flash.html

http://www.dreamworksfansite.com/bandofbrothers/

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Re: Globe Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2086  Monday, 2 September 2001

[1]     From:   Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 31 Aug 2001 07:53:24 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2082 Globe Macbeth

[2]     From:   James Doherty <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 31 Aug 2001 11:11:35 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2082 Globe Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Aug 2001 07:53:24 -0700
Subject: 12.2082 Globe Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2082 Globe Macbeth

>From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
>
>I didn't understand the point of
>the tuxedoes and jazz dancing.  I went to the Globe hoping to get a
>sense of the original performance (I was already familiar with the
>plot).  Unlike Cymbeline for which I paid 9 pounds for an obstructed
>view which was unobstructed and loved, I paid 20 pounds for an
>unobstructed view which was very obstructed for Macbeth which I
>loathed.

I more than agree. Macbeth at the Globe was truly execrable. See below
for an explanation of the dancing conceit.

I saw Cymbeline in July with my family (wife and kids, 8 and 9), and we
all loved it. (Front row, upper gallery, far left, spitting distance
above the stage--great location.) It was a remarkable theater
experience, really taking advantage of the Globe's intimacy with a
spirit of generosity and joy rarely exhibited when lights tyrannize the
blocking and exclude the audience. Highly recommended, and kudos to Mike
Alfreds and Mark Rylance.

My next experience was seeing Macbeth at the Globe in August. Same
seating, one bay farther left. I had read no reviews (I have since), so
my response within minutes, and throughout, of contempt and disdain, was
unsullied by the opinions of others. The experience of that production
was the complete antithesis of Cymbeline, and epitomized what is wrong
with much theatre today (Shakespeare and otherwise). Macbeth was
completely lacking in the authenticity that the Globe justifiably revels
in. (And by that I don't mean the "merry old England" represented by the
unplastered timbers; I mean the kind of honesty and authenticity that is
truly attainable and worth striving for.)

That Macbeth production failed to take advantage of the very things that
make Shakespeare and the Globe great. It was a superficial, effete, over
choreographed production that might have flown with the "sophisticated"
audience in a West-End Brooke-box It displayed none of the unblocked
organic joy revealed in Cymbeline, a mood that transmitted itself to the
audience and reflected back into the production.

The production's tenuous conceit (I'm being charitable here)-the witches
singing and dancing, telegraphed out into the entire play-is based on
the *very portions* of the play that were written not by Shakespeare,
but by Middleton, and which are so obviously alien to its whole spirit
and character. Two spurious and inept passages were used to pollute the
whole play.

It's like the director had no concern for his text, and didn't even
think about the "space" (literal and figurative) in which he was
working. The lame exits and entrances through the pit were a sad display
of his longing for a modern theatre space, and the rigidity of the whole
production bespoke his complete failure to understand or care for the
theatre he was working in, its spirit, and its audience.

This was confirmed when I went to the Talking Theatre session after the
show. The actors said of the director (this is a direct quote): "I don't
think he really knew what he wanted. I think he just wanted to do
something different." (So he ended up playing with chairs: "hey, we
workshopped it and that's what we came up with!")

It's mind-boggling that the director could have left his actors so
unclear as to what they were trying to do, despite the excellent
introduction to the character of the Globe which they described having
received from Mark Rylance in their first week.

They also commented that they quickly discovered in preview that they
weren't playing to the space, and tried to make adjustments. But the
inherent design of the production made it impossible to do more than
move a few speeches and talk to the upper galleries. When the bad
reviews hit, we were told, he came back for some tweaking, but with his
heels dug in. He was even more insistent on his "vision" than before.

In trying to do something "different," he in fact gave us more of the
same old: grab a simplistic conceit and run with it, no matter that it's
ill conceived and at odds with the text and the space. It's much less
taxing on the director, not requiring real engagement with a living
audience. It may (?) briefly impress others in the theatre community,
but it is not there for the people who count.

The director certainly succeeded in his petty goal, as evidenced by the
concluding comment from the woman sitting next to me (from Chicago, she
had directed Macbeth a year back): "Well," she said, "that was
different."

This production was a violation of the text, a violation of the space,
and-I mean this in its most penetrating sense-a violation of the
audience.

Steve
http://princehamlet.com

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Doherty <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Aug 2001 11:11:35 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.2082 Globe Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2082 Globe Macbeth

I saw the Globe's Macbeth three weeks ago. I was very disappointed. The
style of the production did not serve this play. Rather, it was
Shakespeare forced to serve the director's style.

Macbeth is a play about murder and it's consequences.  What moves are
the hands of the murderers, then the blood that flows from the victims
(whose deaths are represented by a small stone dropping into a metal
pail, you can barely hear the click), then the consequent dripping of
this very blood onto the murderers themselves. The blood in this
production is flimsily represented by gold tinsel.

The director's heavy-handed 'tuxedo' style greatly limited the actors as
well. In eveningwear, only appropriate to an evening ball, the actors
dance away from the play's central ideas. Performances were flat.  I'd
have had a much better time watching penguins.  They'd have been happier
'actors' and far more joyful to watch -- though a far greater expense
than their poorly paid counterparts.

Shakespeare's plays can, and should, be presented in a myriad of ways*.
However, every producer, director, and actor's main focus must be to
serve the play - NOT to use the play for a personal agenda.

J. Doherty
NYC

* Having said the above, the Globe was built to represent almost exactly
the original theater. I wish Macbeth and/or Cymbeline were done 'almost
exactly' as they may have been presented in Shakespeare's day.

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Undergrad Shakespeare Conference CFP

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2087  Monday, 2 September 2001

From:           Megan S. Lloyd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Aug 2001 15:10:08 -0400
Subject:        Undergrad Shakespeare Conference CFP

* PLEASE POST *

Creative Visions: Shakespeare on Stage and on Film

Seventh Annual Undergraduate Shakespeare Conference
November 16-17, 2001
King's College
Wilkes-Barre, PA

Call for Papers

Is Portia a "perpetual" cross dresser?  Is Titus Taymor's or Tamora's?
Without the women in Richard III, would Richard himself be as powerful?
Is Shakespeare racist and sexist or is he progressive and critical of
his own culture as we see him on film or on stage?  Join us in answering
these questions as we explore Creative Visions: Shakespeare on Stage and
on Film, a Student Conference held November 16-17, 2001 on the campus of
King's College in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

Paper Guidelines

1. Please submit a brief abstract or a complete paper to participate in
the conference.

2. Abstracts of papers must be typed, double-spaced, not more than 250
words, and clearly indicate the thesis of the paper.

3. Papers should be about seven - nine pages long, typed, and
double-spaced (reading time between ten - fifteen minutes).

4. All submissions must include the following information: title of
paper, author's name, complete contact information, including telephone
number, e-mail address, and fax number if available; institutional
affiliation; conformation of the ten-fifteen minute reading length;
state of need for
audio-visual equipment.

5. Abstracts or completed papers MUST be submitted by Monday, October 1,
2001.  Work submitted after the deadline cannot be considered.

Workshop Guidelines

1. Please provide a brief abstract outlining the purpose of the
workshop, and a brief summary of the activities to be incorporated.

2. All abstracts must include the following information: title of
workshop, leader's name, complete contact information, including
telephone number, e-mail address, and fax number if available;
institutional affiliation; conformation of twenty-five - forty minute
length; state of need for
audio-visual equipment.

3. It is the responsibility of the student leader to provide necessary
materials unless otherwise discussed.

4. Abstracts MUST be submitted by Monday, October 1, 2001.  Abstracts
submitted after the deadline cannot be considered.

Please send inquiries, abstracts, and papers to Sara DeLuca, c/o Megan
S.
Lloyd, Department of English, King's College, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711.
Phone: 570 - 208 - 5900, ext. 5393
Fax: 570-208 - 5988 E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

As King's College celebrates fifty years of sharing Shakespeare with
students, we are pleased to invite you and your students to participate
in the Seventh Annual Undergraduate Shakespeare Conference.  We welcome
student papers, workshops, interactive presentations, and acts that
explore performance adaptations of Shakespeare's many works. Established
to provide students with constructive interaction with their peers and
active investigation into the life and work of Shakespeare, the
conference serves as a vehicle to foster undergraduate scholarship and
further study.

The conference will begin on Friday, November 16 at 1:00 PM, and will
include plenary speakers, a Renaissance Feast, traditional paper
sessions, workshops, and performances, and the opportunity to see a
production of Twelfth Night.  Sessions will continue through Saturday,
and will conclude with a post-conference party in the evening.

Submissions are not limited to this year's theme, and we accept a
variety of projects and ideas.  Papers should be no longer than nine
pages (reading time ten - fifteen minutes).  Further, each workshop will
be allotted twenty-five to forty minutes, and we ask that student
leaders plan their activities accordingly (specifications and deadlines
are enclosed).

Nestled in the Wyoming Valley, King's is easily accessible by car and
plane.  Wilkes-Barre offers inexpensive accommodations and a number of
unique shops and eateries.

Please announce the conference to your students and encourage them to
conduct a workshop, read a paper, or simply attend.  Thank you for your
anticipated participation and interest.  If you have any questions
please feel to contact us.

Sincerely,

Dr. Megan Lloyd                                 Sara DeLuca, Student
Assistant
King's College                                          King's College
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711                          Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Phone (570) - 208 - 5900, ext. 5393                     (570) - 595
-2427
Fax (570) - 208 - 5988
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare, Gangsters, and A Lady for a Day

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2085  Monday, 2 September 2001

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Aug 2001 10:48:53 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare, Gangsters, and A Lady for a Day

In the Frank Capra film Lady for a Day (1933) a gangster character is
named Shakespeare, and also referred to by a pool hustler character
named Judge Blake as the Bard of Avon.  DVD coming soon.
http://us.imdb.com/Title?0024240

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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