2001

Re: Stratford Festival

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2231  Thursday, 27 September 2001

[1]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 13:47:26 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival

[2]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 14:01:36 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival

[3]     From:   Jadwiga Krupski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Sep 2001 13:03:51 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival

[4]     From:   Alan Somerset <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 14:54:52 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 13:47:26 -0400
Subject: 12.2222 Stratford Festival
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival

Stratford has announced some of its season. Christopher Plummer in Lear
may well go fast. Members of the Festival get to order tickets before
they go on public sale. Check out their web site at
www.stratford-festival.on.ca although it appears not to have the new
season posted yet.

Mary Jane

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 14:01:36 -0400
Subject: 12.2222 Stratford Festival
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival

>Does anyone know when the Stratford festival announces the plays for the
>next season? The reason I'm asking is because my mom was thinking about
>getting my husband and me tickets for next season for a Christmas
>present, but I didn't know if that would be feasible as far as timing is
>concerned.  We went to the festival for our honeymoon, and I'm dying to
>go back. We loved it. Anyway, if anyone knows about next season, I'd be
>delighted to know what's up.

Usually around the end of October, but so far we know the following (or
rather, we are fairly certain - things could still change):

Richard III (rumored to be with Tom McCamus)
Henry VI (the three parts perhaps presented instead as two)
My Fair Lady
King Lear (Jonathan Miller directing Christopher Plummer)
Alls Well That Ends Well

Also, in the new experimental space:

The Mandrake by Niccolo Machiavelli
The Two Noble Kinsmen by William Shakespeare and John Fletcher
The Swanne, Part One: The Death of Cupid by Peter Hinton

A Festival of One-Act Plays:
Shadows by Timothy Findley
High-Gravel-Blind by Paul Dunn
The Modernist by Anton Piatigorsky
Walk Right Up by Celia McBride
Bereav'd of Light by Ian Ross
The Human Voice by Jean Cocteau
No Exit by Jean-Paul Sartre
Radio Scripts by Federico Fellini

Tanya "Still next to the Avon Theatre" Gough
Poor Yorick
www.bardcentral.com

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jadwiga Krupski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Sep 2001 13:03:51 -0400
Subject: 12.2222 Stratford Festival
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival

Call  -800-567-1600 (Stratford festival). Good luck, Jadwiga Krupski

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Somerset <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 14:54:52 -0400
Subject: 12.2222 Stratford Festival
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2222 Stratford Festival

The Stratford Festival Playbill for 2002 has not been completely settled
yet; as soon as it is I will post details on SHAKSPER.  The Box Office
opens for advance bookings (members at various levels) before opening to
the public in late November or early December.  So, there will be time
to book tickets as Christmas presents.

Alan Somerset
University of Western Ontario

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Regarding Editor's Decision

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2230  Thursday, 27 September 2001

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 18:35:34 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2211 Regarding Editor's Decision

[2]     From:   John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Sep 2001 12:25:57 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2211 Regarding Editor's Decision


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 18:35:34 +0100
Subject: 12.2211 Regarding Editor's Decision
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2211 Regarding Editor's Decision

> I think that Professor Cook has the right idea in keeping these pages
> clear of the political anger that a discussion of the Sept. 11th events
> might generate.

I agree with Paul Doniger.  On three of the poetry lists to which I
subscribe, I'd need both hands to count the number of long-standing
friendships which have shattered in these last days.

All else aside, in purely practical terms, Hardy is entirely in the
right.

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Sep 2001 12:25:57 -0400
Subject: 12.2211 Regarding Editor's Decision
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2211 Regarding Editor's Decision

I understand Hardy's ruling and will abide by it but could we compromise
on this?

Could we merely point out parallels to Shakespeare without political
anger.

The similarities to Henry IV are downright irresistible.

e.g. We have a former drunken playboy turned warrior-prince.

Did George Sr ever tell Junior about 'the ill-devised and crooked ways I
met this crown'?

Did the English ever latch onto that terrorist Owen Glendower?

_______________________________________________________________
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Re: Bartlett

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2228  Thursday, 27 September 2001

[1]     From:   Ray Lischner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 10:04:11 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[2]     From:   Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 11:13:42 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[3]     From:   David Crosby <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:38:50 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[4]     From:   Gary Allen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:03:17 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

[5]     From:   Philip Tomposki <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:11:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ray Lischner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 10:04:11 -0700
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

> Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar
> Quotations* by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A*
> quote, "In peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in
> rest, secure from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is
> not in the 1992 edition.

The 1917 edition does not have that quote. It has only three quotes from
Titus Andronicus.

Ray Lischner, author of Shakespeare for Dummies
(http://www.tempest-sw.com/)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 11:13:42 -0700
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

Mike Jensen asked:

> Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar Quotations*
> by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A* quote, "In
> peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in rest, secure
> from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is not in the 1992
> edition.

A quick look at Bartleby.com, the online Bartlett's, turned up nothing.
Since this is the 1910 edition, and Mike searched the 1992, it may not
be amiss to conclude that John Bartlett did not include the Titus
passage in his "posie of other men's flowers."

The only Early Modern reference that turned up in a search of All
Quotations was Proverbs 3:13-18 -- the passage that personifies Wisdom,
of whom it is said inter alia, that "Her ways are ways of pleasantness,
and all her paths are peace."

Bartleby found this in The Columbia World of Quotations, 1996.

Bartleby's quotation of the day from Colin Powell would be proscribed on
SHAKSPER.

Nancy Charlton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Crosby <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:38:50 -0500
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

The quote in question appears in my 1948 Bartlett on p. 76.

David Crosby

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gary Allen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:03:17 EDT
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

Mike Jensen asks:

>Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar Quotations*
>by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A* quote, "In
>peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in rest, secure
>from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is not in the 1992
>edition.

The Tenth Edition (1919) is online at:

http://www.columbia.edu/acis/bartleby/bartlett/

I don't find your quote among the few cullings from TA.  Wasn't that
still a time when most Shakespeareans thought TA couldn't be by WS and
tended to ignore it?  Possibly, by 1948, its wider reattributing to WS
would have prompted more citations from it in the 1940s editions of
Bartlett.

Gary

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Philip Tomposki <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 20:11:58 -0400
Subject: 12.2215 Bartlett
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2215 Bartlett

Mike Jensen ssks:

"Has anyone access to a 1948 or earlier edition of *Familiar Quotations*
by John Bartlett?  I am trying to learn if the *Titus A* quote, "In
peace and honor rest you her, my son.  Repose you here in rest, secure
from worldly chances and mishaps." is included.  It is not in the 1992
edition."

www.bartleby.com has the 1919 version of Bartlett.  I found three
references from Titus and two footnotes, but not this one.

As for the "dumb friend" quote:

        TO MY DOG "BLANCO."
              ----------
  My dear, dumb friend, low lying there,
   A willing vassal at my feet,
  Glad partner of my home and fare,
   My shadow in the street.

  I look into your great brown eyes,
   Where love and loyal homage shine,
  And wonder where the difference lies
   Between your soul and mine!

  I scan the whole broad earth around
   For that one heart which, dear and true,
  Bears friendship without end or bound,
   And find the prize in you.

  I trust you as I trust the stars,
   Nor cruel loss; nor scoff of pride,
  or beggary, nor dungeon-bars,
   Can move you from my side!

  As patient under injury
   As any Christian saint of old,
  As gentle as a lamb with me,
   But with your brothers bold;

  More playful than a frolic boy,
   More watchful than a sentinel,
  By day and night your constant joy
   To guard and please me well.

  I clasp your head upon my breast-
   The while you whine and lick my hand-
  And thus our friendship is confessed,
   And thus we understand!

  Ah, Blanco! did I worship God,
   As truly as you worship me,
  Or follow where my Master trod
   With your humility,

  Did I sit fondly at his feet,
   As you, dear Blanco, sit at mine,
  And watch Him with a love as sweet,
   My life would grow divine!
                  -J. G. Holland.

Hope this helps.

Philip Tomposki

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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Re: Quote

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2229  Thursday, 27 September 2001

[1]     From:   C. Leidig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 14:16:45 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Quote?

[2]     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:17:55 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2223 Quote?

[3]     From:   Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Sep 2001 10:16:34 +0100
        Subj:   Willing vassal


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. Leidig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 14:16:45 -0400
Subject:        Re: Quote?

This is not from Shakespeare. It's from "To My Dog Blanco."

My dear, dumb friend, low lying there,
A willing vassal at my feet,
Glad partner of my home and fare,
My shadow in the street.

Chris

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:17:55 -0400
Subject: 12.2223 Quote?
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2223 Quote?

You can find this on the web (the greatest encyclopedia ever
constructed):

                                 THE INDIAN HELPER
                        -----------------------------
                         ~~ FOR OUR BOYS AND GIRLS ~~
                   ==========================================
                   VOLUME III  FRIDAY, June 22, 1888   NO. 45
                                CARLISLE, PA.
                   ==========================================
                    Selected by Susan Longstreth for
                           The Indian Helper.

                         TO MY DOG "BLANCO."

                        My dear, dumb friend, low lying there,
                A willing vassal at my feet,
                Glad partner of my home and fare,
                My shadow in the street.

                        * * * * * * * * * * * *
                                By J. G. Holland

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Sep 2001 10:16:34 +0100
Subject:        Willing vassal

My dear, dumb friend, low lying there, / A willing vassal at my feet...

This intrigued me, and I went googling for it.

It appears to come from a poem called "To my dog 'Blanco'", by J.G.
Holland. Two texts are online - apologies for the gruesome URLs:

http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/moa/pageviewer?frames=1&coll=moa&view=50&root=%2Fmoa%2Fscmo%2Fscmo0022%2F&tif=00541.TIF&cite=http%3A%2F%2Fcdl.library.cornell.edu%2Fcgi-bin%2Fmoa%2Fmoa-cgi%3Fnotisid%3DABP7664-0022-84
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ciis/message/59

 I'm sure Holland would be pleased to be mistaken for Shakespeare!

All the best,
  Matt.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Re: Moll

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2227  Thursday, 27 September 2001

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 09:30:17 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2208 Re: Moll

[2]     From:   Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:18:33 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2208 Re: Moll


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 09:30:17 -0700
Subject: 12.2208 Re: Moll
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2208 Re: Moll

I was thinking of Field.  My thanks to all who contacted me, both on and
off list, with the answer.  I wish the Day play was extant.

Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Sep 2001 16:18:33 -0400
Subject: 12.2208 Re: Moll
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2208 Re: Moll

Dana Shilling quotes in part from

>Carl Miller, Stages of Desire: Gay Theatre's Hidden
>History (Cassell 1996):
>
>"As well as _The Roaring Girl_, first performed in 1610, she is presumed
>to be the title figure of the play _Mad Pranks of Merry Moll of the
>Bankside_ by John Day in the same year. In 1612 she appears as a
>character in Nathan Field's play _Amends for Ladies_, and is herself in
>court for real, accused, among other things, of performing on stage."

In the epilogue of The Roaring Girl, Thomas Dekker promises, "if what
both [authors] have done/ Cannot full pay your expectation,/ The Roaring
Girl herself, some few days hence,/ Shall on this stage give larger
recompense;/ Which mirth that you may share in, herself does woo you,/
And craves this sign: your hands to beckon her to you" (lines 33-38).

Studies of dating place The Roaring Girl at the Fortune Theatre in the
spring of 1611. The court document, printed on page 262 of Paul
Mulholland's Revels edition, gives us this:

"[S]he hath vsually in the habite of a man resorted to alehowses
Tavernes Tobacco shops & also to play howses there to see plaies &
pryses & namely being at a playe about 3 quarters of a yeare since at
the ffortune in mans apparell & in her bootes & with a sword by her
syde, she told the company there present that she thought many of them
were of opinion that she was a man, but if any of them would come to her
lodging they should finde that she is a woman & some other immodest &
lascivious speaches she also vsed at that time And also sat there vppon
the stage in publique viewe of all the people there presente in mans
apparrell & playd vppon her lute & sange a songe."

I conclude that this almost certainly describes the fulfillment of
Dekker's promise in the epilogue. Though I touch upon this briefly in my
research, this definitely merits further consideration of how Moll's own
performance contrasts to the authors' presentation of her as a
character, especially the relatively more modest version Middleton
extols in the epistle "To the Comic Play-readers." For a side point, if
one could go back in time, I can't think of any early modern performance
I wish I could've seen more than The Roaring Girl the night Moll
appeared.

Jack Heller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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