2001

Scotland, PA Teaser

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2189  Monday, 17 September 2001

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 09:19:54 -0400
Subject:        Scotland, PA Teaser

To view the teaser for Scotland, PA, a spin-off of Macbeth set for
release on Feb. 8, 2001, go to
http://www.lot47.com/scotlandpa/thankyou.html

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Re: Times Article

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2188  Monday, 17 September 2001

[1]     From:   Louis Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 14 Sep 2001 13:04:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 15:06:18 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Sep 2001 13:04:40 -0500
Subject: 12.2175 Re: Times Article
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article

Mike Jensen wrote,

"I have not seen *A Midsummer Night's Cream,* or any other X-rated
Shakespearian offshoots, but I don't see a difference in kind, only in
use.  Aside from the fact that one is pornographic, and the other was in
family newspapers, as Shakespearean appropriations they seem to have
more commonalities than differences.  If *Terry* is worth knowing about,
then *Cream* must be...  The mere fact that the material is pornographic
does not mean it is by definition less noteworthy than a comic strip,
just more offensive to many.  I don't want to study it, but I'm glad
someone reports that it exists."

[I am, too, Michael, and I agree that Shakespeare porn and Shakespeare
in "Terry and the Pirates" are both somewhat noteworthy.  But my earlier
questions are:

[ a) Should a university responsible for forming the intellectual
regimen of students with such limited time for study as both our
undergraduates and graduates students have to spend on any subject,
allow them to choose either of these subjects, both of which must, under
the pressure of that time-limit, have the very lowest priority as
offerings in any department in which they might appear?  Shouldn't a
university have a philosophy of some kind, a concept of a well-educated
person that directs the creation of its programs and demands standards
for them relative to that concept?  Or is it properly merely an
intellectual shopping mall, an inchoate smorgasbord of courses inviting
titillation and ultimately confusion?

[b) And even if a university decides that such investigations should be
made, should they not, so far as the time-limited student is concerned,
be no more than a squiggle in a course - presumably under the aegis of
one of the departments of the social sciences - that examines the
reflections of literature (or art in general) in the popular culture?

         [ L. Swilley]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 15:06:18 -0400
Subject: 12.2175 Re: Times Article
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2175 Re: Times Article

Followers of this thread, especially those who seem to think that
Shakespeare's writings are asexual, disembodied, and sacred,  may be
interested in reading Robert E. Scholes' The  Rise and Fall of English:
Reconstructing English as a Discipline   (New Haven : Yale University
Press, 1998).  Scholes concludes that the "quasi-religious status once
accorded English literature . . . is hardly viable any longer" [19].

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Re: All's Well

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2186  Monday, 17 September 2001

From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Sep 2001 12:21:53 -0400
Subject: 12.2179 Re: 'The Scottish Play'
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2179 Re: 'The Scottish Play'

Brian Willis said:

> I don't know why but Much Ado is considered the play that can never go
> wrong, much like Macbeth is the cursed play.
>for them.

"All's Well" was once known as "the unfortunate comedy," although I
think there are fewer rituals surrounding it.

Dana Shilling

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The Reader Revealed: A Folger Shakespeare Library

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2187  Monday, 17 September 2001

From:           Eric Luhrs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 14:37:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        The Reader Revealed: A Folger Shakespeare Library Exhibition

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

This announcement was sent to SHARP-L, but I'm sure that our members
will be interested as well.

  Eric Luhrs

--

THE READER REVEALED
SEPTEMBER 12, 2001 - JANUARY 19, 2002

New Folger Exhibition Highlights Renaissance Reading Habits

Washington, DC - Early readers left tantalizing clues about themselves
and what they were reading-signatures on title pages, presentation
inscriptions, notes in margins, and passages copied out into manuscript
commonplace books. Drawing primarily from its own collection of
books-both manuscript and printed- broadsides and engravings, the
Folger's new exhibition, The Reader Revealed, examines how and what
people read, publicly and privately, in 16th and 17th century Europe.

"Books hold a special place in human experience," explains Sabrina
Alcorn Baron, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at the University
of Maryland, Baltimore County and the exhibition's curator, with
Elizabeth Walsh and Susan Scola.  "This exhibition explores that
privileged relationship."

Through Gutenberg's innovations in printing, reading-once the preserve
of a small educated elite-opened up to include kings and tradesmen,
saints and sinners, celebrities and nonentities in the Renaissance.
They read to learn and improve skills; to attain moral enrichment and
for spiritual contemplation; and for the sheer joy and pleasure of
reading.

From highly decorated "icon" books to cheap, well-thumbed "chap books"
of the late 17th century-which were carried in pockets until many
disintegrated-the exhibition shows the variety of ways in which readers
have related to books over the centuries.  The use of books as
repositories of birth records, scholarly marginalia, and schoolboy
doodles is also examined.

Visitors may be surprised to learn that many people in the early modern
period, especially women, could read but not write; that the phrase "red
letter days" has a literal derivation; and that certain censorship
strictures once applied to reading aloud-but not silently.

Perhaps most surprising to the modern reader, though, may be how little
has changed.  Children still use pictures to learn the alphabet ("A is
for Apple"), publishers still use prefaces to tout a book's contents,
and people still misplace their reading glasses (check out one reader's
ingenious solution involving a hollowed out binding).

 "Early modern readers reveal themselves to us through their books,"
explains Rachel Doggett, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Books and
Exhibitions.  "Exquisite decoration and extensive annotation are some of
the evidence we have that these books were well-used and well-loved.
Every book in the Folger collection is unique.  Every one has passed
through different hands and has accumulated its own particular history,
and many preserve evidence of their earliest readers and their social
and intellectual worlds. In this exhibition, those readers are vividly
revealed to us."

Lenders to the exhibition include Peter W.M. Blayney, Catholic
University of America Library, Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth,
Massachusetts, and Saint John's University in Collegeville, Minnesota.

This exhibition has been funded, in part, the Winton and Carolyn Blount
Exhibition Fund.

Media Previews
The exhibition will be available for preview by members of the media
Tuesday, September 4 through Tuesday, September 11, 10 am - 4 pm.  A
special guided tour led by the exhibition's curator will be Wednesday,
September 5, 11 am.  For more information, please call (202) 675-0342.

Special Programs
On Wednesday, October 17, at 5:30 pm, Washington Post Book World Senior
Editor and author himself of Readings:  Essays & Literary Entertainments
Michael Dirda hosts a "Gathering of Friends" conversation on the joys of
reading for contemporary booklovers followed by a reception and special
exhibition viewing. Tickets $25 members,  $30 non-members.  To reserve,
call the Folger membership office at (202) 675 - 0359.

Catalog
The exhibition catalog is available for purchase at the Folger Museum
Shop or online at www.shakespeare-etc.org.

Children's Guide
Developed by the Folger Docents, Children's Guides to the exhibition are
available.  The Guide includes a scavenger hunt using the exhibition and
fun facts and figures for the young museumgoer.

Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol Street, SE, one block from
the Capitol.  Open Monday through Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm. Closed Sundays
and federal holidays. Admission is free.

Guided tours:  11 a.m. weekdays and at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Saturdays.

To learn more about the Folger and its cultural programs, call (202)
544-7077 or visit www.folger.edu.

For media requests and photos, contact Garland Scott at (202) 675-0342
or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: 'The Scottish Play

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.2185  Monday, 17 September 2001

From:           David Wallace <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Sep 2001 00:56:18 -0700
Subject: 12.2179 Re: 'The Scottish Play'
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.2179 Re: 'The Scottish Play'

Actors have quite a few superstitions that are consistently observed.
Few actors will wish a fellow "good luck" before a performance. "Break a
leg" is the preferred blessing. I've heard dozens of stories that claim
to trace the origin of this expression - none of them very convincing.
(In Quebec, Francophone actors simply say "Merde" - who knows why? Some
Anglophone Canadians favour the French expression.)

Stage techies will admonish actors who whistle on-stage, which they
consider bad luck. The explanation for this seems reasonable. Sailors
often worked the rigging and the fly gallery in the 19th Century.
Traditionally they signaled each other by whistling. A whistling actor
risked cueing a rigger to fly scenery in or out before his cue.

The most convincing explanation (I've heard) for the superstition
regarding "The Scottish Play" maintains that, historically, Macbeth has
always been a crowd-pleaser. If a repertory company's newest production
was fairing poorly, the manager might drag out the company's Macbeth to
replace a faltering play and stimulate some box office receipts. Thus,
uttering the title Macbeth risked jinxing a new play. Most actors I know
will tolerate the phrase "one swell foop" but quoting from the play in
the dressing room will elicit some severe looks.

In the film version of the play "The Dresser", Tom Courtney (Norman, the
dresser) forces Albert Finney (Sir) out of the dressing room for quoting
from "The Scottish Play". Sir is required to turn around three times,
spit, and swear ("piss pot" is offered as the profanity in this
instance). He must knock to be re-admitted. There are many variations -
but spinning around seems to be universal.

Cheers. David Wallace

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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