Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: July ::
Re: Why Shakespeare Conflicts
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1679  Tuesday, 3 July 2001

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 02 Jul 2001 08:17:24 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1670 Re: Why Shakespeare Conflicts

[2]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 02 Jul 2001 18:33:53
        Subj:   Re: Why Shakespeare Conflicts


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 02 Jul 2001 08:17:24 -0700
Subject: 12.1670 Re: Why Shakespeare Conflicts
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1670 Re: Why Shakespeare Conflicts

Hi, Pervez,

I want to question your point #3.

>To accept that Shakespeare is universal is not to accept that he is
>*uniquely* so. Twenty years ago, the TV show 'Dallas' was universal (in
>the weak sense); it was watched avidly in all corners of the world, by
>people whose lives were hugely different to those of Texan oil barons.
>Lots of works translate to different cultures in unexpected ways. I
>suspect that in the minds of some claimants for universality, the
>question is bound up with a view that Shakespeare is uniquely great.
>Universality and greatness are not the same thing.

I think we mean different things by *universal.*

*Dallas* was not *universal* in any way that is meaningful to me.  Yes,
a lot of people in a lot of places watched it (I'm on shaky ground here,
since I watched the first 20 minutes of the first episode, then bailed
forever), but I'm sure it was perceived in different ways in different
places.  I'm sure few in the country that produced it recognized
themselves or their friends in the characters.  Yes, they recognized
archetypes of good and evil, and they may have even recognized the
motivation clich

 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.