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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: July ::
Re: "What's in a name?"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1692  Thursday, 5 July 2001

[1]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 15:25:43 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

[2]     From:   Janet Costa <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 07:58:53 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

[3]     From:   David Knauer <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 10:30:33 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

[4]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 20:25:51 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

[5]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 12:31:01 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

[6]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 17:05:57
        Subj:   Re: "What's in a name?"

[7]     From:   Stuart Taylor <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 4 Jul 2001 02:14:15 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

[8]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 4 Jul 2001 05:30:13 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

[9]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 04 Jul 2001 11:32:38 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 15:25:43 +0100
Subject: 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

Abigail Quart wrote

>"Deconstruct." That's from the philosophy that insists
>that if something can be shown to have more than one
>meaning it's impossible to know the meaning and
>therefore it has no meaning? Which was invented by
>a guy trying really hard to prove that Nazi propaganda
>he wrote during World War II really wasn't?

Since there are question marks after these two sentences,* I assume
Abigail Quart wants readers to know that she's not quite sure of this
stuff.  Stylistically, it's preferable to admit ignorance rather than
write an assertion and put a question mark after it. No, Abigail, that
really is not what is meant by deconstruction. And, no, Paul de Man did
not invent it. You might advance your education by reading the
following:

Peter Barry _Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural
Theory_ (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1995). This is a
standard primer, but Robin Headlam Wells has a fair criticism of it in
the introduction to Neo-historicism and in the afterword to _Shakespeare
on
Masculinity_

Charting the development of theory as response to historical and
cultural pressure in the twentieth century is:

Terry Eagleton _An Introduction to Literary Theory_ (Oxford: Basil
Blackwell, 1983). There's a second, updated edition, too.

A personal favourite of mine is:

Jeff Collins and Bill Mayblin _Derrida for Beginners_  (Cambridge: Icon,
1996)

SHAKSPERians interested in this sort of thing who happen to be in the UK
in November may want to go to Loughborough University on 10th for the
"life.after.theory" event in which Jacques Derrida will be giving a
lecture and then taking part in a round-table discussion. The organizer
is Dr John Schad (
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 ).

Gabriel Egan

PS Careful readers will spot that the second one's merely a fragment.
Columbia's writing program can only do so much.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Costa <
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Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 07:58:53 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

So. Have we decided that the Renaissance was keeping their discovery of
Viagra a secret?

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Knauer <
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Date:           Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 10:30:33 -0500
Subject: 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

Abigail Quart wrote:

"'Deconstruct.' That's from the philosophy that insists that if
something can be shown to have more than one meaning it's impossible to
know the meaning and therefore it has no meaning? Which was invented by
a guy trying really hard to prove that Nazi propaganda he wrote during
World War II really wasn't?"

Well played-trot out deMan's lies to discredit all of deconstruction. I
hear Nietzsche could be pretty unpleasant, too, and his sister was a
total fascist! Would your morality test leave us with any philosophers
or critics to read? And no, deconstruction doesn't begin with deMan.
There's this other, probably unpleasant, guy, Derrida. And that joy you
say you feel in perceiving the multiple meanings of a text or in staring
at a Gauguin painting until the colors go all funny? These
deconstruction guys actually like doing that, too. Pity you haven't read
them.<?xml:namespace prefix = ons =
"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 Then this:

"It is a romance novel commonplace to refer to a man in an amorous mood
as 'hard as a rock' . . . I also have a postcard sent me by a former
monk showing an interesting stone feature of Bodmin Moor . . . Then
there was that Osiris thing where he got cut up and thrown to the fishes
and Isis found and reassembled every part but one: guess which?"

I won't bother with the above bizarre genealogy, except to ask, does
Columbia know you're using their computers?

 Dave Knauer

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 20:25:51 +0100
Subject: 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1683 Re: "What's in a name?"

From:           Stuart Taylor <
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"I believe that Wycliff

 

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