Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: July ::
Re: Shakespeare.Papers.com
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1805  Thursday, 19 July 2001

[1]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Jul 2001 09:30:04 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1785 Re: Shakespeare.Papers.com

[2]     From:   Fran Barasch <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Jul 2001 17:15:07 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1785 Re: Shakespeare.Papers.com


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Jul 2001 09:30:04 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.1785 Re: Shakespeare.Papers.com
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1785 Re: Shakespeare.Papers.com

I agree entirely with Thomas Larque's defense of those individuals whose
writing habits do not produce traditional "first drafts," etc.  About
half the time my own writing follows what he describes of his own
practice; the other half is complete with lots of index notecards,
outlines, etc.

For more years than I care to remember I have taught writing, both in
formal "composition" courses AND as a necessary component of literature
courses.  I have felt hypocritical in requiring students to produce
notes, outlines, drafts, etc.  It is, nonetheless, good practice -- *in
composition classes*.

In my literature courses I eventually came to a plagiarism-prevention
policy which, while requiring more work on my part up front, reduced the
work needed when papers were turned in.  I would make a LONG list of
paper topics, or rather "research questions," and raffle them off to the
students.  The questions/topics would always be so detailed and so
specific that the chances of them being able to plagiarize was greatly
reduced (I would not dare say "eliminated"; the ingenuity of students in
this area is not to be underestimated).  And I would make up a new list
each time I taught the course so that people couldn't copy the past
term's work.

Now, I am revelling in the British system wherein paper topics are
assigned by my departmental superiors...and, thankfully, marked by those
same superiors.  Plagiarism may be occurring (probably is, in fact),
but...I can now choose to smile benignly and look the other way.

Cheers,
Karen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Barasch <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Jul 2001 17:15:07 EDT
Subject: 12.1785 Re: Shakespeare.Papers.com
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1785 Re: Shakespeare.Papers.com

On the day I collected term papers, I asked students to write an
abstract (one or two pages) of the paper they have just turned in; these
are collected same day.  Comparing the abstract with the term paper can
produce interesting results.  You might try it once and see.  Fran
Barasch (retired)

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.