2001

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1879  Friday, 27 July 2001

[1]     From:   Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 26 Jul 2001 16:55:38 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1874 Two Gents, Catching Cold

[2]     From:   Rainbow Saari <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 27 Jul 2001 11:22:46 +1200
        Subj:   RE; 12.1874 Two Gents, catching cold


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Jul 2001 16:55:38 +0100
Subject: 12.1874 Two Gents, Catching Cold
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1874 Two Gents, Catching Cold

>In Two Gents, Act I, scene 2, line 136, Lucetta says, speaking about the
>paper scraps that Julia leaves lying on the ground, "Yet here they shall
>not lie, for catching cold."  What the heck does this mean??  I looked
>it up in a lexicon dictionary but couldn't find an entry for this
>particular instance of the word "cold."

For fear of catching cold. Lest they might catch cold.

Brian Haylett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rainbow Saari <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Jul 2001 11:22:46 +1200
Subject:        RE; 12.1874 Two Gents, catching cold

I think Lucetta's line, "Yet there they shall not lie, for catching
cold", expresses the idea that if the pieces of the letter are left
where they are, then the matter they contain (Proteus' love suit to her
mistress) may likewise cool off, grow 'cold', and sicken.

Alternately/ additionally that  Julia may grow emotionally colder
towards Proteus if Lucetta allows the matter of the torn letter to
'lie'. Lucetta is, after all, not fooled by Julia's protestations of
lack of interest; Julia, she notes, " would be best pleased To be so
angered with another letter." Lucetta  thinks Proteus a worthy suitor
and is unwilling to let the matter grow 'cold'.

The word 'cold' is used two more times in the play, both times in
reference to emotional coldness.

Julia's follow on line to Lucetta's is,  "I see you have a month's mind
to them."

Can someone tell me what the expression  'a month's mind' means? My
guess is " I see you've taken a passing fancy [temporary interest in,
changeable like the moon] to them. Any other thoughts?

All the best,
Rainbow

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