2001

Performing the World

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1697  Thursday, 5 July 2001

From:           Mary Fridley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 12:17:32 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Performing the World

To whom it may interest,

I am writing to invite you to be a part of - together with friends and
colleagues from around the world - a "cross-disciplinary happening"
known as "Performing the World:  Communication, Improvisation and
Societal Practice," a conference being held October 12-14, 2001 in
Montauk, New York.

Performing the World will bring together scholars, therapists, health
and helping professionals, educators, business professionals, community
builders, performers, artists - and the irrepressibly curious -to learn
from each other and create new horizons of possibility.  Conversations,
panels, workshops and performances will explore the rich potential of
performance for personal and social change.

Plenary Sessions:
Ken Gergen and Fred Newman (Performance:  Act Before You Think)
Arthur Penn (Little Big Man: Film as Social Construction)
Susan Jaffe [Dance as Growthful Play]
Dan Friedman (Mundane Performance: Performance Outside the Theatre)
Lenora Fulani, Pam Lewis and the All Stars Talent Show Network
(Growing Up Performed:  Youth and Performance)
...with a performance by the Castillo Theatre Ensemble

Focused sessions include:
Therapeutic Change  &#61559;   Reshaping Expertise and
Agency through the Performance of Conversation:
Doctor-Patient, Therapist-Client and Teacher-Student
&#61559;   Boundary Crossing Through Performance
&#61559;    Scholarship as Performance  &#61559;
Performing Sex and Intimacy   &#61559;   Youth
Development through Performance    &#61559;   Dance
and Identity   &#61559;   Performance in
Organizational Development   &#61559;   Performance
and Personal and Spiritual Transformation   &#61559;
Video, Installations and more...

For full program information and to register, visit our website at
www.performingtheworld.org or contact Melissa Meyer at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 212.941.8906.  For other inquiries,
call me at 212.941.8906 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Performing The World is sponsored by the Taos Institute and Performance
of a Lifetime.

Sincerely,
Mary Fridley
Producer

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Re: British Library

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1696  Thursday, 5 July 2001

[1]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 11:39:11 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1680 Re: British Library

[2]     From:   Arthur D L Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 4 Jul 2001 10:46:09 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1680 Re: British Library

[3]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 4 Jul 2001 08:39:05 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.1680 Re: British Library


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 11:39:11 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 12.1680 Re: British Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1680 Re: British Library

> Must one have a university affiliation?  England has
> a large and
> impressive group of independent scholars -- are they
> all denied use of
> the library?  Writers and journalists, too?

No, you don't need to have a university affiliation.  For most graduate
students that is the quickest and easiest way to get a reader's card,
though.  As I recall, if you're an independent scholar, you need to
explain why you want to use the British Library resources and tell them
which other major research libraries you have already used.  I think
they're really fairly flexible about this...they basically just want to
encourage, for example, secondary school students to make use of other
library facilities if the other facilities are adequate for what they
need.

Sorry if I was unclear in my original posting.  As I said, the BL has
been very helpful and very accommodating to me, and I would not want to
give the impression that they turn anyone away merely for lack of a
university affiliation.

Cheers,
Karen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur D L Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 4 Jul 2001 10:46:09 +0800
Subject: 12.1680 Re: British Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1680 Re: British Library

> > you go to the side office where they dispense Reader's Cards.  You
> > should bring with you a letter or other documentation that indicates
> > your university affiliation;
>
> Must one have a university affiliation?  England has a large and
> impressive group of independent scholars -- are they all denied use of
> the library?  Writers and journalists, too?

No, you don't need a univ. affiliation.  They do want to know that you
need a research library, not the public library two blocks away, so give
them some evidence of a research project.  Again, most of the info you
need is on their Portico website.

Regards,
Arthur Lindley
http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 4 Jul 2001 08:39:05 +0100
Subject: 12.1680 Re: British Library
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.1680 Re: British Library

Geralyn Horton asks:

>Must one have a university affiliation?  England has a large and
>impressive group of independent scholars -- are they all denied use of
>the library?  Writers and journalists, too?

The answer is yes, in principle.  But this is where the British class
system comes into play...  You need to have the self-confidence to talk
your way past the Readers' Admissions Office.  They are mostly looking
for evidence of being registered for a higher degree or being a bona
fide scholar in some other way.  There are other loopholes, however: I
used the magic words "I am a member of the Library Association"! (This
automatically qualified me for a five-year pass.)

John Briggs

_______________________________________________________________
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Re: All may be well.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1694  Thursday, 5 July 2001

From:           John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 12:17:47 -0400
Subject: 12.1674 All may be well.
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1674 All may be well.

> Claudius, after beating himself to spiritual death, closes his soliloquy
> (Act III, Scene III) on a note of hope (All may be well).  What gave him
> reason to hope?
>
> He opens the soliloquy by comparing his crime to that of Cain.  He
> explores the possibility of being granted mercy (that is, after all,
> what mercy is for), and the utility of prayer.  But he concludes that
> mercy is not for him and that prayer will avail him nothing because he
> still retains his crime-begotten gains (his crown and his queen), and
> his ambition, which got him into his present predicament
>
> He never suggests the possibility of giving up those gains in exchange
> for mercy.
>
> He acknowledges that he may very well get home safely "in this world"
> because justice, which he wishes fervently to evade, is less than
> perfect, but "there" , justice will look him in the eye and he will have
> to "give in evidence" (did a lawyer write that line?)
>
> He thinks that repentance might help him, but, he cannot repent.
>
> All in all, he recognizes that he is in a very bad way, and calls for
> angelic assistance (which contradicts his prior assertion that no prayer
> could help him anyway.
>
> Suddenly, his mood changes, and he feels that "all may (yet) be well".
> What could have happened to have changed his appraisal of his boxed-in
> position? In his very next line, he tells us that his thoughts are very
> much on earth and will not go to heaven, so what does he mean by "all
> may be well"?
>
> What did the author intend to convey with that line?
>
> Jacob Goldberg


Hi, Claudius is a politician who always tries to put the best face on
things, a spin doctor. Tries to present himself as Hamlet's 'loving
father'. Greets the suicidal Ophelia with, 'How do you, pretty lady.'
Even when run through with a poisoned sword he says, 'O! Yet defend me,
friends; I am but hurt.'

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Re: Terry Pratchett's "Wyrd Sisters"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1695  Thursday, 5 July 2001

From:           Michele Bolay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 13:53:20 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 12.1686 Re: Terry Pratchett's "Wyrd Sisters"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1686 Re: Terry Pratchett's "Wyrd Sisters"

>I also recommend Pratchett's and Neil Gaiman's _Good Omens_, a hilarious
>book on Armaggeddon (yes, I just wrote that).  It includes a footnoted
>reference to the "Lost Quarto" of Shakespeare.

A whole-hearted "second" to *Good Omens*!!! I've recommended it many
times, and even people who say they "hate" fantasy have loved it.

Michele Bolay

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1693  Thursday, 5 July 2001

[1]     From:   Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 16:19:49 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals

[2]     From:   David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 14:37:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals

[3]     From:   Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 15:30:45 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals

[4]     From:   Philip Weller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 14:10:10 -0700
        Subj:   Capulet's reason for his change of mind


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 16:19:49 +0100
Subject: 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals

> >... it may be that the Ghost is (punningly?) commanding Hamlet to 'put my
> >limbs together again'.
>
>Hm... What would he mean by that? (Does David Bishop's book answer my
>question?)

He would mean that Hamlet should reassemble (in himself) those qualities
that made up his father, most obviously the warlike stance and automatic
opposition to Norway. Sorry David Bishop does not agree, but I think he
took me rather too literally.

Brian Haylett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 14:37:44 -0400
Subject: 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals

Louis Swilley's account of Hamlet's "princely responsibility" agrees
almost entirely with the argument of my book (at clashingideals.com). I
call the impulse to revenge the heroic ideal and the duty to the state
the patriotic ideal. Beyond that I add-Shakespeare adds-the Christian
ideal, which joins the patriotic in militating against revenge. The
chapters on these three are called The Son, The Father and The Holy
Spirit. The latter contains an examination of how these forces work in
the prayer scene.

I'm very happy to see a sign of critical convergence.

Best wishes,
David Bishop

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Jul 2001 15:30:45 -0400
Subject: Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals
Comment:        SHK 12.1685 Re: Hamlet's Clashing Ideals

  Louis Swilley wrote:

> It may be pertinent to this general discussion to recall that Hamlet is,
> after all, a prince of the realm, with the public responsibilities
> thereof.  He cannot go about stabbing kings indiscriminately, as though
> he were a mere revenger  ...
> The killing of Claudius must be a public act of justice, not a private act
> of revenge - that is Hamlet's essential problem rather back-handed him
> by the ghost ... .

Actually, the Ghost backhands three essential problems to Hamlet after
requesting vengeance:

1. Taint not your mind (which Mr. Swilley mentions in this posting),
asking Hamlet to be a revenger who does not descend into either madness
or villainy (already a nearly impossible task).

2. Don't do anything to your mother (perhaps the Ghost doesn't trust his
own son in this matter).

3. Protect the state from lechery and incest (or perhaps it means to
preserve the dignity and morality of the country).

It seems to me that it is largely for these reasons that Hamlet
contrives the inner play as a tool to get Claudius's crimes in the
public eye-a plan that backfires miserably. It goes a long way to
explaining his so-called hesitation in accomplishing his revenge. Old
Hamlet has undermined his son from the start.

>I think it particularly brilliant of Shakespeare to have
> Claudius exposed at last as the murderer not of the old King, but of one
> who is to inherit the throne, in other words as a traitor to the realm,
> his crime is against the kingdom itself.

Claudius is also exposed as the murderer of Laertes and of the Queen
(his sister-wife ... positively Wagnerian, isn't it?), the last of which
must seem even more horrible to those "who look pale and tremble at this
chance."

Paul E. Doniger

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Philip Weller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 03 Jul 2001 14:10:10 -0700
Subject:        Capulet's reason for his change of mind

In the thread, "Hamlet's Clashing Ideals," Louis Swilley  wrote:

>A somewhat similar case is that of Capulet's change of mind
>about the marriage of Juliet; it is  the intervening death of kinsman
>Tybalt that has made Capulet so sharply aware of the immediate need to
>secure his bloodline through Juliet - but the *reason* for his sudden
>change of mind is never mentioned.

Doesn't this speech by Lady Capulet explain that "reason"?

"Well, well thou hast a careful father, child,
One who, to put thee from thy heaviness,
Hath sorted out a sudden day of joy,
That thou expects not, nor I look'd not for."
(3.5.107-110)

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://ws.bowiestate.edu>

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