2001

Re: Painters and Poets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1677  Tuesday, 3 July 2001

From:           Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 2 Jul 2001 10:04:10 -0400
Subject: 12.1658 Re: Painters and Poets
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.1658 Re: Painters and Poets

Thanks for these suggestions.

Hugh Grady

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Conference (Update)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1676  Monday, 2 July 2001

From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 02 Jul 2001 12:22:22
Subject:        Conference (Update)

Dear SHAKSPEReans

I'm delighted to announce that Professor Helen Cooper will join us at
our conference "New Directions in Biographies of Shakespeare, Marlowe
and Jonson" (22-23 September 2001). Please be kind to find the detail
below.

For enquiries about the conference, please e-mail me at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (NOT This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Thank you.

Best wishes,

Takashi Kozuka
Centre for the Study of the Renaissance
University of Warwick (UK)

*****************************************************************

NEW DIRECTION IN BIOGRAPHIES OF SHAKESPEARE, MARLOWE & JONSON

A Two-Day International Conference to be Held at King Edward VI School,
Stratford-upon-Avon, on 22-23 September 2001

*****************************************************************

For a long period biography seemed a dead issue in literary and theatre
studies. Now a number of scholars are writing biographies of early
modern authors. Why has this change taken place? This conference will
explore the "new directions" in the biographies of three Elizabethan and
Jacobean playwrights: Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Jonson. It will examine
the most recent biographical studies of the playwrights and attempt to
chart a course for future studies.

Participants include:

  - Helen Cooper (Oxford, UK)
  - Lloyd Davis (Queensland, Australia)
  - Ian Donaldson (Cambridge, UK)
  - Katherine Duncan-Jones (Oxford, UK)
  - Richard Dutton (Lancaster, UK)
  - Peter Holland (The Shakespeare Institute, UK)
  - Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam, UK)
  - J. R. Mulryne (Warwick, UK)
  - Alan H. Nelson (UC, Berkeley, USA)
  - David Riggs (Stanford, USA)
  - Margaret Shewring (Warwick, UK)
  - Stanley Wells (The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, UK)
  - Richard Wilson (Lancaster, UK)
  - Blair Worden (Sussex, UK)

Conference Fee: 


All may be well.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1674  Monday, 2 July 2001

From:           Jacob Goldberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 1 Jul 2001 02:47:55 EDT
Subject:        All may be well.

Claudius, after beating himself to spiritual death, closes his soliloquy
(Act III, Scene III) on a note of hope (All may be well).  What gave him
reason to hope?

He opens the soliloquy by comparing his crime to that of Cain.  He
explores the possibility of being granted mercy (that is, after all,
what mercy is for), and the utility of prayer.  But he concludes that
mercy is not for him and that prayer will avail him nothing because he
still retains his crime-begotten gains (his crown and his queen), and
his ambition, which got him into his present predicament

He never suggests the possibility of giving up those gains in exchange
for mercy.

He acknowledges that he may very well get home safely "in this world"
because justice, which he wishes fervently to evade, is less than
perfect, but "there" , justice will look him in the eye and he will have
to "give in evidence" (did a lawyer write that line?)

He thinks that repentance might help him, but, he cannot repent.

All in all, he recognizes that he is in a very bad way, and calls for
angelic assistance (which contradicts his prior assertion that no prayer
could help him anyway.

Suddenly, his mood changes, and he feels that "all may (yet) be well".
What could have happened to have changed his appraisal of his boxed-in
position? In his very next line, he tells us that his thoughts are very
much on earth and will not go to heaven, so what does he mean by "all
may be well"?

What did the author intend to convey with that line?

Jacob Goldberg

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Lesbian Teen Film with Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1675  Monday, 2 July 2001

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 1 Jul 2001 13:26:03 -0400
Subject:        Lesbian Teen Film with Shakespeare

"Lost and Delirious" is teen film set up in a lesbian boarding
school--sort of  Dead Poets Society and makes extensive quotations from
R&J, 12N, and apparently Antony and Cleopatra.

Here's more:

Directed by Lea Pool. Starring Piper Perabo (Coyote Ugly), Jessica Par


Re: "not well married"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1673  Monday, 2 July 2001

From:           Stuart Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 30 Jun 2001 09:14:21 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 12.1656 Re: "not well married"
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1656 Re: "not well married"

With regard to:

"She's not well married that lives married long,
But she's best married that dies married young"
(Friar Lawrence, RJ),

Graham Hall said, "No edition I've read - although there may be one -
gives a gloss that incorporates the obvious bawdy pun on dying."

The passage cited by Mari Bonomi would support such a reading (Capulet
to Paris):

"O son, the night before thy wedding day
Hath death lain with thy wife. There she lies,
Flower as she was, deflowered by him."
(4.5.41-43; New Folger Library edition).

Thus, the Friar Lawrence passage could read:

"She's not well married that [doesn't die] married long,
But she's best married that dies married young".

(Didn't someone suggest that the Capulets are unhappily married? Or did
I imagine that?)

Another 'father' having lusty thoughts about his 'child'? (To add to
Capulet and Ed Pixley's example).

In any event, Friar Lawrence, being a bit of a rebel, and knowing Juliet
is not dead, might just pun his way through this little melodrama.

I believe the pun holds, at the same time as do other meanings, such as
condolence, philosophical truism, etc.

Graham Hall continues, "I do not suggest that Shakespeare put such
thoughts in the sanctified mind of a holy man, but my groundling mind
cannot resist the suspicion that he constructed it for those of us
accustomed to the sulphureous odours of the pit."

But in fact, aren't Holy men people, rather than God?  And being fallen,
aren't they subject to 'impure thoughts' that seek expression, just like
the rest of us?  Can any cognitive censor completely filter out or
abolish such ideation, thereby sanctifying a human mind?  Doesn


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