2001

Re: Squeaking Cleopatras

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1877  Friday, 27 July 2001

From:           Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Jul 2001 15:36:07 +0100
Subject: 12.1867 Re: Squeaking Cleopatras
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1867 Re: Squeaking Cleopatras

Yes.  I saw "Cressida".  A beautifully acted production as well as a
very interesting script.  Another plot element that is perhaps relevant
to this discussion was the depression of one of the boys as he moved
from the major female roles to very minor male ones as he moved from a
boy actor of female parts to a young adult male actor, losing the
attention and devotion reserved for the boy leads.

The script has been published, so anybody who missed it, but would be
interested to see the script can get hold of it.

Thomas Larque.

"Shakespeare and His Critics"
http://ds.dial.pipex.com/thomas_larque

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"Lesbian" Romeo and Juliet in Birmingham

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1876  Thursday, 26 July 2001

From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Jul 2001 08:29:49
Subject:        "Lesbian" Romeo and Juliet in Birmingham

Dear SHAKSPEReans:

The following article appeared in the Daily Telegraph. (The URL can be
found after the "copy & paste".) The "lesbian adaptation" was the exact
phrase the newspaper used. Has anyone seen this production?

Takashi Kozuka

PS The punctuation used in the title of the article is not mine but the
DT's.

****************************************

"Wherefore art thou, Romeo?"

By Daily Telegraph Correspondent
(Filed: 23/07/2001)

IT is one of the few absolutes of Shakespeare that when Juliet calls out
from her balcony for Romeo in Scene II, she is referring to her man.

No longer. A new interpretation of Romeo and Juliet being staged this
week has dispensed with Romeo the man and replaced him with Romeo the
woman. The lesbian adaptation of the play has already attracted
criticism, promising as it does a bed chamber scene complete with
kissing in the nude.

Traditionalists will no doubt be further appalled to learn that Juliet's
nurse has been turned into a homosexual transvestite. Yesterday, the
producers of the play, being staged at the Crescent Theatre in
Birmingham, defended the changes and denied they were merely trying to
court publicity.

Nick Fogg, 28, the female director and a member of the Rattlestick
theatre company based in Bridgnorth, Shropshire, claimed the credit for
coming up with the idea of two female leads.

"I don't think anyone else has done the play in this way," she said. "It
is not meant to be offensive or gratuitous. It is being done carefully
and tastefully in a modern setting, sticking faithfully to the original
text."

In the production Romeo is played by Kate Hilder, 21, and Juliet by
Bobby Bancroft, 25. The play runs from Wednesday for four nights as part
of a two-week fringe festival in the city.

Dick Knight, a director of the festival, said: "This is not a
deliberately sensationalist production and is not meant to titillate
audiences." But Tony Wareing, chairman of the pressure group Mediawatch
UK, accused the producers of cashing in on controversy.

"People are becoming heartily sick of this sort of thing being offered
up as entertainment," he said. "What a pity we have to see this sort of
sensationalism in an attempt to fill seats."

Copied & pasted from:
http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2001/07/23/nrom23.xml

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Two Gents, Catching Cold

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1874  Thursday, 26 July 2001

From:           Susan St. John <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jul 2001 20:11:13 -0700
Subject:        Two Gents, Catching Cold

In Two Gents, Act I, scene 2, line 136, Lucetta says, speaking about the
paper scraps that Julia leaves lying on the ground, "Yet here they shall
not lie, for catching cold."  What the heck does this mean??  I looked
it up in a lexicon dictionary but couldn't find an entry for this
particular instance of the word "cold."

A related question...I know I need to get an OED (shame on me for not
having one already), but what is the best resource for place and name
pronunciations??

And in the meantime, how do you all pronounce Lucetta??  loo-set'-tuh
or loo-chet'tuh  or some other??

Thanks in advance,
Susan.

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Annotated First Folio on the Web

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1875  Thursday, 26 July 2001

From:           Jonathan Hope <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Jul 2001 10:10:11 +0100
Subject:        Annotated First Folio on the Web

I've been off-line for a while, so sorry if this repeats something
previously posted, but July's book of the month from Glasgow
University's special collections is their annotated copy of the first
folio.

http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/exhibns/month/july2001.html

Jonathan Hope
Strathclyde University
Glasgow

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Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1873  Thursday, 26 July 2001

From:           Michael Edgar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thu, 26 Jul 2001 12:03:16 +1000
Subject:        Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association (ANZSA)
Conference

Shakespeare: Looking Before and After: A Performance Appraisal

The Seventh Biennial Conference of the Australian and New Zealand
Shakespeare Association

February 7 - 11, 2002

At the Academy of Arts, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania,
Australia

http://www.perform.utas.edu.au/anzsa/index.html

This conference aims to look at the position of Shakespeare studies and
Shakespeare performance at the beginning of the twentieth-century. It is
hoped that a number of the contributions will offer with a retrospective
look at how Shakespeare has been viewed in different societies and eras.
How has Shakespeare been appraised, who have been the appraisers and
what have been their values?
Equally, it is hoped that other papers will use the perspective of the
beginning of the twenty-first century to consider the future of
Shakespeare.

Four hundred years after Hamlet seems a good time to appraise the
performance, past and projected, of the Shakespeare industry in its
theatrical, scholastic, educational and its other continually
diversifying branches.

By most indicators Shakespeare Inc. has been a success of Coca-Cola
proportions. The original Globe product has been truly globalised,
franchised into all major languages, and is available all over the
world.

The secondary industry of Shakespearean scholarship continues its
staggering annual output of writings and provides employment to
thousands.

Educationally, numerous websites market the delights of Shakespeare to
the younger generations.
Performance of the actual scripts proceeds apace in their original form,
or on film and TV or in other contemporary media.

The closing years of the twentieth-century saw Shakespeare voted Man of
the Millennium, involved in an Oscar win and credited with the
'invention of the human.'

How did it all happen and can the boom continue? Has the value of
Shakespeare been inflated beyond reason?

Can the commodification of Shakespeare continue apace? Is the industry
self-perpetuating or is it heading for a crash? Could Shakespeare Inc.
suddenly find itself in an Encyclopedia Britannica position?

Are we still in the era of Modern English, which Shakespeare helped to
shape or are we entering a new phase of the language in which a visually
oriented and cyberspeaking generations will simply find renaissance
texts too hard.

Academically, could Shakespeare become Chaucerfied, a niche subject
fascinating a dwindling 


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