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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: June ::
Re: Tea Time
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1396  Wednesday, 6 June 2001

[1]     From:   John Briggs <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Jun 2001 11:22:03 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.1364 Re: Tea Time

[2]     From:   Sophie Masson <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Jun 2001 21:42:37 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1364 Re: Tea Time


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Jun 2001 11:22:03 +0100
Subject: 12.1364 Re: Tea Time
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.1364 Re: Tea Time

This has been an interesting exchange, but I can't help noting that
Richard Burt has never explained why he asked the question in the first
place!

John Briggs

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Jun 2001 21:42:37 +1000
Subject: 12.1364 Re: Tea Time
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1364 Re: Tea Time

Another small aside, and re Sam Small's comment on breakfast: On a
recent trip to Montreal, in Canada, where I have a lot of family (it was
my first trip there, though), I was amazed to discover that there was no
specific word/phrase in Quebec French for breakfast, as in French,
'petit dejeuner'. Instead, and perhaps more authentically, as Quebec
French does seem to preserve some old forms that have been modified in
France, both breakfast and lunch were called by the same word,
'dejeuner'.  Which of course, literally means 'break fast'.  Supper, or
'souper' is occasionally used in France, but it does usually literally
mean a very light evening meal, and usually consisting of soup.

Sophie Masson
Author site:
http://www.northnet.com.au/~smasson

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