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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: June ::
Re: Scavenging Pigs and Trash
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1458  Tuesday, 12 June 2001

[1]     From:   Vick Bennison <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jun 2001 10:15:25 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1451 Re: Scavenging Pigs and Trash

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jun 2001 09:02:22 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1451 Re: Scavenging Pigs and Trash


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Vick Bennison <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jun 2001 10:15:25 EDT
Subject: 12.1451 Re: Scavenging Pigs and Trash
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1451 Re: Scavenging Pigs and Trash

For what it's worth, I was is boot camp at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in
1969.  In the mess hall they had two garbage cans for tray scraps.  One
can was for banana peels and egg shells.  The other was for everything
else.  The "everything else" can was sold or given to local pig farmers
as pig slop.  The other?  The story was that pigs would eat anything
except banana peels and egg shells.

- Vick

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jun 2001 09:02:22 -0700
Subject: 12.1451 Re: Scavenging Pigs and Trash
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1451 Re: Scavenging Pigs and Trash

Just to add, somewhat unnecessarily, to Nicole Imbracsio's posting on
pigs in the streets of London, Barbara Tuchman, in A Distant Mirror
noted that there were, in fact, laws against most of the various causes
of unsanitary conditions in medieval cities.  One would assume that
these extended to the Renaissance (I recall that John Shakespeare was
fined for keeping a dung-pile, in fact).  The problem, however, was that
"Public flouting of ordinances was more to blame for unsanitary streets
than inadequate technology" (107).  The plague, in other words, was
caused more by lack of governance than by ignorance.

She cites a rather old article, Ernest L. Sabine, "City Cleaning in
Medieval London".  Speculum (January 1937).

Cheers,
Se

 

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