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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: June ::
Re: Camillo and Paulina
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.1465  Tuesday, 12 June 2001

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jun 2001 08:14:16 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1437 Re: Camillo and Paulina

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Jun 2001 13:54:03 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.1437 Re: Camillo and Paulina


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jun 2001 08:14:16 -0700
Subject: 12.1437 Re: Camillo and Paulina
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1437 Re: Camillo and Paulina

The ever respected Ed Taft wrote:

>He thinks he knows Paulina's mind and how it works.

Well, after taking her scorn for all those years, you can make a pretty
good case that he does.  I grant the case for knowing her mind as it
touches Camillo is weaker, which is why I have not argued it.

>This king hasn't learned much, Mike. He has to face the evidence that he as
>wrong in the past, but he has not changed because of it.

I have to disagree here, Ed, which will not come as a surprise.  Since I
don't think you give the old boy enough credit, I'll give an approach
that I hope does.

He does not end the play in a state of jealous rage.  He does not put
his wife up for trail a second time, or have his daughter taken back to
the bears.  I'd call that progress.  He has been through a lot of loss,
realizes he is responsible for it, and suddenly has restoration of wife
and daughter.  I'd call that transformation.  To build a case on the
comparative trifle of Paulina and Camillo (which you may not have done,
but it is what you have revealed so far), is to miss most of what
happens in this lovely scene of restoration and reconciliation.

Ever naive,
Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Jun 2001 13:54:03 -0400
Subject: 12.1437 Re: Camillo and Paulina
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.1437 Re: Camillo and Paulina

Lawrence Manley observed

> doesn't the possible doubling of Camillo with Antigonous add
> something rather nice to the ending?

Absolutely.  I had been under the impression that Camillo and Antigonus
were on stage together in the early court scenes, but I checked and they
are not.  Since their characters would likely be in court on formal
occasions, the fact that they are not together suggests that the parts
were doubled.

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