Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: February ::
Re: Shakespeare from the bottom up
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0363  Thursday, 7 February 2002

[1]     From:   Martin Steward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Feb 2002 19:00:21 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0341 Re: Shakespeare from the bottom up

[2]     From:   Anna Kamaralli <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 07 Feb 2002 11:06:19 +1100
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare from the bottom up


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 6 Feb 2002 19:00:21 -0000
Subject: 13.0341 Re: Shakespeare from the bottom up
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0341 Re: Shakespeare from the bottom up

On the "reading from the end backwards" topic, Don Bloom remarks that,
"I have found the technique also useful in dealing with novels (pace
Forster), even those that prove the rule like 'Great Expectations.'".

For goodness' sake, don't try this with Agatha Christie!

One can't imagine B & F's "A King and No King" WITHOUT reading it
last-scene-first, though, come to think of it...

m [adam I'm adam]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Kamaralli <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 07 Feb 2002 11:06:19 +1100
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare from the bottom up

Don Bloom writes,

To add my two cents to the "bottom up" thread: I discovered (or imagined
I had, after reading of it someplace), that one could clarify many of
Shakespeare's plays wonderfully by starting at the end and working
backwards (or upwards).

I would be VERY cautious about applying this method to the full play,
rather than just a speech.  Remember that characters are often not the
same people at the beginning of the play that they are at the end.

As Carol Rutter has ably demonstrated in "The Politics of Cressida's
Glove", the tendency for interpreters to read the ending of a play back
into earlier appearances of a character has frequently corrupted the
staging of that character's journey.  In practical terms this means
that, because Cressida betrays Troilus with Diomedes in Act IV, she has
most often been played as some kind of lascivious nymphomaniac in Act I,
when the events that might motivate her betrayal have not yet occurred.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.