Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: February ::
Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0452  Monday, 18 February 2002

[1]     From:   Sam Small <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 15 Feb 2002 17:27:24 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0436 Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 12:39:34 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0436 Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest

[3]     From:   Martin Steward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 13:05:49 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0436 Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 15 Feb 2002 17:27:24 -0800
Subject: 13.0436 Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0436 Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest

Don Bloom asserts his interpretation of social historical phenomena as
if they were assured facts stated by God.  With remarks like "the sins
of our fathers" and "God knows the English treated the Irish as badly as
they could" I am reminded of the crass anti English films of the shallow
Mel Gibson.  There have been many others, of course.  It always strikes
me as ironic that the country that is most successful in any conflict in
any era is later accused of gaining that advantage by foul means.  This
is the false logic of all current anti-Americanism.  I have to remind Mr
Bloom that since 1066 there has been a struggle between Catholic
southern Europe and the northern Scandinavian countries, which,
historically, included England.  However, Scotland and Ireland retained
their strong Catholic connections - and still do.  Of those northern
countries England was the richest and most successful due to its climate
and trading position.  However, from William the Conqueror onwards the
Catholics have tried to bring England back into the Catholic fold.
Shakespeare was right in the middle of one very hot period of this
struggle.  The Irish and Scottish Catholics who plotted against England
with France, Spain and the Vatican cannot complain when they lose wars
in this deadly struggle.  When the stakes are as high as national
annihilation the vanquished must expect rough treatment.  All very
unpleasant, but it is the way of the world that Shakespeare often noted.

SAM SMALL

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 12:39:34 -0000
Subject: 13.0436 Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0436 Re: Shakespeare's The Tempest

I was intrigued to read that Don Bloom has "heard that Navajo and other
Native American craftmakers have had to leave their version of the
swastika out of any materials they might want to market -- even though
it is quite innocent.  Thoughtful Americans and Europeans can't abide
it, even knowing that it was a sacred decoration a thousand years before
Hitler". India House in the Strand, London (or Aldwych, I'm not sure
exactly), has swastikas all the way around it. I think they probably
rotate the opposite way to the Nazi's swastikas, but still, it's kind of
unnerving as you pass by. The irony is that the neo-nazis whom we
associate with the wielding of swastikas would be horrified to find them
plastered all over India House (unless they themselves had grafittoed it
there, alongside "pakis go home" or whatever).  They tend to forget that
Hitler's "Aryans" were Indo-European, I guess. But then, why would one
expect rational thinking from such people? I like to think of myself as
more rational, in all humility - which is why I find the swastikas on
India House vaguely unnerving at first, but ultimately delightful, and
would never dream of asking for these ancient symbols to be removed
because of their appropriation by a mere four generations of thickies.

m

Apologies to anyone who hoped that this post had anything to do with The
Tempest (but maybe it does, in some oblique way....)

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.