2002

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0462  Monday, 18 February 2002

[1]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 12:23:05 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0441 Replacement for Devil's Horn

[2]     From:   John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 23:04:33 -0600
        Subj:   The Devil's Horn


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 12:23:05 -0000
Subject: 13.0441 Replacement for Devil's Horn
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0441 Replacement for Devil's Horn

I think I agree with you, Bill.

"Let's write Good Angell on the Devill's horn, / 'Tis not the Devill's
Crest" surely means, "Were we to write 'good angel' on the devil's horn,
that would not make 'good angel' the true motto for the devil's crest."
It's about appearance and reality, as you state in your note in SQ.
Shakespeare has Juliet say something similar - "a rose by any other name
would smell as sweet"; or, in other words, "Let's write 'Venus fly-trap'
on the rose's thorn, / Rotting meat is not the rose's smell".

m

(non Angeli sed Angli)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 23:04:33 -0600
Subject:        The Devil's Horn

Register me as coming down solidly on the Godshalk side of this case.

The whole business of angels in the play as focused on Angelo's name is
of central importance.  Angelo, suitably to his name, wants
hybristically to rise to a realm where disembodied Angels preside and in
which no passion and no sexuality are present.  The events of the play
teach him that there is no escaping our human sexuality. Lucio and
Pompey both have speeches about the fundamental role of sex in human
makeup.  Pompey 2.1.237-39  "If you head and hang all that offend that
[sexual] way but for ten year together, you'll be glad to give out a
commission for new heads."  Lucio 3.2.100-101.  "It is impossible to
extirp it [lechery] quite, Friar, till eating and drinking be put down."

JWV

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.