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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: February ::
Re: Classical Acting: Signs of Decline
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0475  Tuesday, 19 February 2002

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Feb 2002 11:48:01 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0465 Classical Acting: Signs of Decline, Part I

[2]     From:   P. D. Holland <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Feb 2002 17:12:20 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0465 Classical Acting: Signs of Decline, Part I

[3]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Feb 2002 17:12:25 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0465 Classical Acting: Signs of Decline, Part I

[4]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Feb 2002 09:57:02 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0465 Classical Acting: Signs of Decline, Part I

[5]     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Feb 2002 19:40:02 GMT0BST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0465 Classical Acting: Signs of Decline, Part I


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Monday, 18 Feb 2002 11:48:01 EST
Subject: 13.0465 Classical Acting: Signs of Decline, Part I
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0465 Classical Acting: Signs of Decline, Part I

Charles Weinstein does not bandy words, but expresses an important point
about contemporary acting of the classics, indeed of almost anything.
Where would THE GLASS MENAGERIE have been without Laurette Taylor, Lear
without Wolfit, Titus without Olivier..or THE BELLS without Irving?
These actors did not copy nature but created it.

I saw Dame Flora Robson in a mediocre play THE HOUSE BY THE LAKE with
Andrew Cruickshank. 'Did you enjoy the play, young man?'; to which I
replied 'Well, the story was rather banal, wasn't it?' Dame Flora, who
played a blind woman with her other-planetary voice and facial
movements, rebutted, 'Well, it was an evening in the theatre, wasn't it?



 

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