2002

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0485  Wednesday, 20 February 2002

From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Feb 2002 16:34:41 -0000
Subject:        Machiavelli

Writers such as Richard Morison and William Thomas, among others, had
drawn on Machiavelli in their apologies for the Tudor monarchy. See
Felix Raab, The English Face of Machiavelli: A Changing Interpretation
1500-1700, esp.  pp.68, 86-87. The Discourses and The Prince were not
translated until 1636 and 1640 respectively, by Dacres (with sympathetic
commentaries), but they were freely available in England long before
then. One only has to read Bacon and Ralegh to see that his concepts
were not at all alien to serious political thinkers, nor to Tudor
notions of good government. Shakespeare was probably more interested in
the sensational "Machiavel" stuff, I suppose, which he may have learned
mostly from Marlowe. But Marlowe was no ignoramus, and if he had read
the originals, there is no reason to doubt that Machiavellianism in its
more serious guise could have been doing the rounds among London's
players and dramatists, as well as its politicians and courtiers.

m

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.