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Home :: Archive :: 2002 :: February ::
Re: Shakespeare and Sex
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0494  Wednesday, 20 February 2002

[1]     From:   Brian Willis <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Feb 2002 11:36:21 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex

[2]     From:   Anna Kamaralli <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Feb 2002 09:51:54 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex

[3]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Feb 2002 21:30:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex

[4]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Feb 2002 00:47:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Feb 2002 11:36:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex

> From:           Sam Small

> Quite true, but Bill the Man spent his whole life
> from 18 onwards in
> total and unabashed adulterous affairs with both
> women and men.

Your proof?

Two more points:

1) True, there are a few instances of actual adultery in Shakespeare. I
always thought that more
importantly, the anxiety of adultery is present in nearly every play.

2) Why does everyone forget about King John? It features adultery (in
the lengthy discussions of the Bastard's parentage in Act I) and the
difficulties of parenting (Arthur). Indeed, I argue that the play is all
about parents and children: John and Eleanor, The Bastard and Richard I
and Lady Falconbridge, Lady Blanche and her "father" of sorts John, King
Philip of France and the Dauphin, Constance and Arthur, Austria the
slayer of Richard I and the Bastard's revenge, and finally John and
Prince Henry. Throughout the play are causes and effects between parent
and child. The results are the death of the actual child in the play -
Arthur. Indeed, Richard I's ghost seems to hover over this play and the
action of the play seems to be consequences of his reign, embodied in
the Bastard his son and, from the outset of the play, his actual true
heir.

Brian Willis

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Kamaralli <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Feb 2002 09:51:54 +1100
Subject: 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex

>We also only have Emilia's and Desdemona's word for their fidelity and only
>faith in her word and in the oracle of Delphi for Hermione's.

ONLY????

> As Iago says, what's proof, beholding her topp'd?

How about Tamora's black infant produced while married to Saturnius?
Aaron seemed convinced...

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Feb 2002 21:30:31 -0500
Subject: 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex

RANDY EDDY IN SHORE SHARP SHOCK: "I NEVER DID NAUGHT WITH THAT WOMAN"

Dana Shilling

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Feb 2002 00:47:35 -0500
Subject: 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0468 Re: Shakespeare and Sex

> probably in "Titus"

"Probably"?  The fruit of the dalliance between Tamora and Aaron appears
on stage.  It is possible that he was conceived before the marriage of
Tamora and Saturninus, but too much in the play suggests an ongoing
relationship.

> for all Macduff's
> agony, S chooses not to show him interacting with the children he leaves
> in Scotland

No, but Lady Macduff is shown as a loving mother.  And isn't Aaron a
model father?

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