2002

Re: "Reading" the Plays

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0443  Friday, 15 February 2002

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 20:24:57 -0500
Subject: 13.0416 Re: "Reading" the Plays
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0416 Re: "Reading" the Plays

Unfortunately, the college where I work does little to encourage
research, and there is certainly no research library nearby. But this
question of reading the plays has interested me for a while. So, if I
were going to go further with the question . . .

I would start with Aristotle, and work backwards and forwards. Clearly,
Aristotle treats drama as poetry, and one does not go far into the
Poetics before he's discussing/contrasting tragedy, comedy, and epic.
His audience seems broader than Greek dramatists, so there we have an
ancient notion of drama for reading. So trace Aristotle's sources (and I
suppose including Plato, though I don't have him here) and we'd have the
beginnings--or better to say, the earliest significant expressions of
the ideas of plays to be read (or committed to memory) as well as
viewed.

Jumping forward to the early modern period, I would try to see whether
the publication of the plays dating to the 1510s coincides with a
revival of interest in, or new publications of, Aristotle. I would also
investigate the front matter of those earliest plays, all of which I
think are still extant. Finding out who the printers were, and the
patrons, may help greatly in creating a plausible theory, if not
necessarily a definitive answer.

Jack Heller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Courtly Love in Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0442  Friday, 15 February 2002

From:           Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 22:18:30 -0000
Subject: 13.0432 Re: Courtly Love in Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0432 Re: Courtly Love in Shakespeare

From:           Tue S


Romeo and Juliet at Fordham / Lincoln Center

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0440  Friday, 15 February 2002

From:           Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 12:30:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Romeo and Juliet at Fordham / Lincoln Center

Fordham College at Lincoln Center will present Romeo and Juliet at the
Pope Auditorium, 113 West 60t Street, at Columbus Avenue., New York, NY

Here are the performance times:

Thursdays - Saturdays: February 21-28, March 1 & 2, 8:00 pm

Friday Matinee: March 1, 12 noon

Tickets:  $12, Gen Admission; $8 Fordham Staff-Fac-Alumni; $5 Students
and Seniors

Fordham has a very strong pre-professional theater training program and
their productions are well worth seeing.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Replacement for Devil's Horn

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0441  Friday, 15 February 2002

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 15:48:28 -0500
Subject:        Replacement for Devil's Horn

. . .oh place, oh forme,
How often dost thou with thy case, thy habit
Wrench awe from fooles, and tye the wiser soules
To thy false seeming? Blood, thou art blood,
Let's write Good Angell on the Deuills horne
'Tis not the Deuills Crest:
 (Norton Folio, page 87, TLN 1014-19)

In John Jowett's Oxford text, the final line is changed to read: "'Tis
now the devil's crest" (2.4.17), and in the Textual Companion (471) John
comments that the Folio reading "lends itself to no convincing gloss,"
thus silently dismissing my note on the passage --"'The Devil's Horn':
Appearance and Reality," Shakespeare Quarterly 23 (1972): 202-5. John
and I have discussed this disagreement privately, and we remain at
loggerheads.

So, I would like to bring this problem up for public discussion.

I believe that the final two lines are easily glossed: If we write Good
Angel on the devil's horn, then "fooles" and "the wiser soules" will not
longer see it (i.e. the devil's horn) as the devil's crest.

The Duke words offer a similar gloss: "O, what may man within him
hide,/Though angel on the outward side!" (Oxford 3.1.527-8).

I find an analogue in the Decameron Fourth Day, Second Tale, also about
a fake angel: "They say commonly in proverbial style: A wicked man who
is thought to be good can do evil and yet not have it believed."

Yours, Bill Godshalk

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: New York Times Articles

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.0439  Friday, 15 February 2002

[1]     From:   Geralyn Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 11:51:17 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0427 New York Times Articles

[2]     From:   Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 11:35:55 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0427 New York Times Articles

[3]     From:   Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 08:13:34 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.0427 New York Times Articles


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 11:51:17 -0500
Subject: 13.0427 New York Times Articles
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0427 New York Times Articles

> The New York Times reporter William S. Niederkorn has two articles in
> last Sunday's edition (Feb. 10, 2002).  One is a review of William
> Rubbo's anti-Stratfordian (Marlovian) documentary, "Much Ado about
> Something," and the other is an article that purports to describe the
> authorship controversy but actually advocates the anti-Stratfordian
> position very strongly.  The article does mention Terry Gray

I don't want to step across the line into taboo territory, but I
sincerely hope that the scholars here who consider this a betrayal of
journalistic standards will take a few minutes to email a rebuke to the
NYTimes, at <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

A single sentence is as effective a rebuke as a detailed point-by-point
dissection.  The standard is "weight of the evidence" not "beyond
reasonable doubt".

The NYTimes is widely believed to be a source of unbiased reporting and
fact-checked historical accuracy.  Students use the NYTimes for
research. They will be citing this article for decades.

Geralyn Horton
http://www.stagepage.org
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Feb 2002 11:35:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 13.0427 New York Times Articles
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0427 New York Times Articles

It may be too late for people in New York to get into the discussion,
but I think that this newest batch of Anti-Stratfordians will be on
WNYC's talk show at noon today.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Feb 2002 08:13:34 +1100
Subject: 13.0427 New York Times Articles
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.0427 New York Times Articles

Mike, not William, Rubbo is the Australian film-maker I was telling
SHAKSPERians about last year (or was it the year before?), who contacted
me when I published my piece about supposed Shakespeare conspiracies in
the Sydney Morning Herald. He certainly sems to be getting a lot of
publicity for his efforts.

Sophie Masson
Author site:
http://www.northnet.com.au/~smasson

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.